Probability of having hypertension: Effects of sex, history of hypertension in parents, and other risk factors

Timothy R. Rebbeck, Stephen T. Turner, Charles F. Sing

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27 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine whether paternal and maternal history of hypertension contributes to the probability of an individual having hypertension before and after other measured traits, including sex, are considered. A cross sectional sample of 217 men and 196 women was selected from the general Caucasion population of Rochester, Minnesota without respect to the hypertension status of subjects and their parents. Logistic regression analyses indicated that when no other information was considered, paternal history of hypertension contributed to the probability of having hypertension in men (χ2 = 4.14, df = 1, p = 0.042) and in women (χ2 = 4.12, df = 1, P = 0.042). The odds ratio associated with paternal history of hypertension was 2.80 in men (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-8.0); the odds ratio was 4.11 in women (95% CI = 0.9-19.3). Maternal history of hypertension provided a marginally significant contribution to the prediction of probability of having hypertension in men (χ2 = 3.86, df = 1, P = 0.049 in men), and less so in women (χ2 = 3.31, df = 1, P = 0.068). The odds ratios associated with maternal history of hypertension were 2.85 in men (95% CI = 0.9-8.8) and 3.60 in women (95% CI = 0.8-16.9). A stepwise selection algorithm was used to select other predictors of hypertension in men and women. Other predictors of hypertension identified in men were age and sodium-lithium countertransport level. After these other predictors were considered, paternal but not maternal history of hypertension contributed to the probability of having hypertension in men. In a model that contained these other predictors, the partial odds ratio associated with paternal history of hypertension was 3.38 (95% CI = 1,1 = 10.1). Other predictors identified in women were age, apolipoprotein (apo) B, and apo B squared. After these other predictors were considered, neither paternal nor maternal history of hypertension made a statistically significant contribution to the probability of having hypertension in women. These results suggest that evaluation of the hypertension risk of an individual depends on the sex of the individual, the sexes of the individual's hypertensive parents, and the values of other measured risk factor traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-734
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1996

Keywords

  • Essential hypertension
  • Family history
  • Genetics
  • Logistic regression
  • Predisposition
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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