Prior thoracoscopic surgery may improve reoperative pulmonary resection

Masatsugu Hamaji, Stephen D. Cassivi, K. Robert Shen, Mark S. Allen, Francis C. Nichols, Claude Deschamps, Dennis A Wigle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: although video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for pulmonary resection appears to be associated with more favorable postoperative outcomes than thoracotomy, no reports have discussed its benefit at subsequent reoperative pulmonary resection. Methods: between January 2000 and December 2009, 144 patients underwent reoperative pulmonary resections for benign and malignant nodules at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Their data were evaluated retrospectively. Twenty-three (16%) patients had prior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, and 121 (84%) had undergone a prior open thoracotomy. Intraoperative and short-term postoperative outcomes were analyzed and compared between the two groups, using the chi-square test or Mann-Whitney test. Results: overall reoperative mortality was 1.38% and morbidity was 49.3%. Intraoperative factor analysis showed that the prior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery group more often underwent anatomical resection (p=0.0011) and showed a tendency towards a lower conversion rate from video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to thoracotomy at reoperative pulmonary resection (p=0.051). Short-term postoperative outcomes showed that the prior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery group had a significantly lower morbidity rate (p=0.013), significantly shorter hospital stay (p=0.002), and a tendency for a shorter duration of chest tube drainage (p=0.09). Conclusion: our results suggest that prior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery may lead to improved postoperative outcomes at subsequent reoperative pulmonary resection. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery may be favored for future potential reoperative pulmonary resections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-705
Number of pages6
JournalAsian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery
Thoracoscopy
Lung
Thoracotomy
Morbidity
Chest Tubes
Chi-Square Distribution
Statistical Factor Analysis
Drainage
Length of Stay
Mortality

Keywords

  • Lung Neoplasms
  • Pneumonectomy
  • Reoperation
  • Thoracic surgery
  • Thoracotomy
  • video-assisted

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Hamaji, M., Cassivi, S. D., Shen, K. R., Allen, M. S., Nichols, F. C., Deschamps, C., & Wigle, D. A. (2014). Prior thoracoscopic surgery may improve reoperative pulmonary resection. Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals, 22(6), 700-705. https://doi.org/10.1177/0218492313515252

Prior thoracoscopic surgery may improve reoperative pulmonary resection. / Hamaji, Masatsugu; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Shen, K. Robert; Allen, Mark S.; Nichols, Francis C.; Deschamps, Claude; Wigle, Dennis A.

In: Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals, Vol. 22, No. 6, 2014, p. 700-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamaji, M, Cassivi, SD, Shen, KR, Allen, MS, Nichols, FC, Deschamps, C & Wigle, DA 2014, 'Prior thoracoscopic surgery may improve reoperative pulmonary resection', Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 700-705. https://doi.org/10.1177/0218492313515252
Hamaji, Masatsugu ; Cassivi, Stephen D. ; Shen, K. Robert ; Allen, Mark S. ; Nichols, Francis C. ; Deschamps, Claude ; Wigle, Dennis A. / Prior thoracoscopic surgery may improve reoperative pulmonary resection. In: Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 700-705.
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