Primary progressive apraxia of speech: Clinical features and acoustic and neurologic correlates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes. Method: Two individuals with primary progressive AOS underwent speech-language and neurologic evaluations on 2 occasions, ranging from 2.0 to 7.5 years postonset. Performance on several tests, tasks, and rating scales, as well as several acoustic measures, were compared over time within and between cases. Acoustic measures were compared with performance of control speakers. Results: Both patients initially presented with AOS as the only or predominant sign of disease and without aphasia or dysarthria. The presenting features and temporal progression were captured in an AOS Rating Scale, an Articulation Error Score, and temporal acoustic measures of utterance duration, syllable rates per second, rates of speechlike alternating motion and sequential motion, and a pairwise variability index measure. Conclusions: AOS can be the predominant manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. Clinical ratings of its attributes and acoustic measures of some of its temporal characteristics can support its diagnosis and help quantify its salient characteristics and progression over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-100
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this