Primary lateral sclerosis as progressive supranuclear palsy: Diagnosis by diffusion tensor imaging

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:: Evaluating the integrity of white matter tracts with diffusion tensor imaging may differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy. Methods:: Thirty-three prospectively recruited subjects had standardized evaluations and diffusion tensor imaging: 3 with primary lateral sclerosis who presented with features suggestive of progressive supranuclear palsy, 10 with probable or definite progressive supranuclear palsy, and 20 matched controls. We compared fractional anisotropy of the corticospinal tract, superior cerebellar peduncles, and body of the corpus callosum between groups. Results:: Both the primary lateral sclerosis and progressive supranuclear palsy subjects showed reduced fractional anisotropy in superior cerebellar peduncle and body of the corpus callosum compared with controls, but only primary lateral sclerosis subjects showed reductions in the corticospinal tracts. A ratio of corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle best distinguished the disorders (P <02). Conclusions:: The corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle ratio is a marker to differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)903-906
Number of pages4
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Motor Neuron Disease
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Pyramidal Tracts
Corpus Callosum
Anisotropy

Keywords

  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Motor neuron disease
  • Primary lateral sclerosis
  • Progressive supranuclear palsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Primary lateral sclerosis as progressive supranuclear palsy: Diagnosis by diffusion tensor imaging",
abstract = "Background:: Evaluating the integrity of white matter tracts with diffusion tensor imaging may differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy. Methods:: Thirty-three prospectively recruited subjects had standardized evaluations and diffusion tensor imaging: 3 with primary lateral sclerosis who presented with features suggestive of progressive supranuclear palsy, 10 with probable or definite progressive supranuclear palsy, and 20 matched controls. We compared fractional anisotropy of the corticospinal tract, superior cerebellar peduncles, and body of the corpus callosum between groups. Results:: Both the primary lateral sclerosis and progressive supranuclear palsy subjects showed reduced fractional anisotropy in superior cerebellar peduncle and body of the corpus callosum compared with controls, but only primary lateral sclerosis subjects showed reductions in the corticospinal tracts. A ratio of corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle best distinguished the disorders (P <02). Conclusions:: The corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle ratio is a marker to differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy.",
keywords = "Diffusion tensor imaging, Motor neuron disease, Primary lateral sclerosis, Progressive supranuclear palsy",
author = "Elizabeth Coon and Whitwell, {Jennifer Lynn} and Jack, {Clifford R Jr.} and Josephs, {Keith Anthony}",
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T1 - Primary lateral sclerosis as progressive supranuclear palsy

T2 - Diagnosis by diffusion tensor imaging

AU - Coon, Elizabeth

AU - Whitwell, Jennifer Lynn

AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.

AU - Josephs, Keith Anthony

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Background:: Evaluating the integrity of white matter tracts with diffusion tensor imaging may differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy. Methods:: Thirty-three prospectively recruited subjects had standardized evaluations and diffusion tensor imaging: 3 with primary lateral sclerosis who presented with features suggestive of progressive supranuclear palsy, 10 with probable or definite progressive supranuclear palsy, and 20 matched controls. We compared fractional anisotropy of the corticospinal tract, superior cerebellar peduncles, and body of the corpus callosum between groups. Results:: Both the primary lateral sclerosis and progressive supranuclear palsy subjects showed reduced fractional anisotropy in superior cerebellar peduncle and body of the corpus callosum compared with controls, but only primary lateral sclerosis subjects showed reductions in the corticospinal tracts. A ratio of corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle best distinguished the disorders (P <02). Conclusions:: The corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle ratio is a marker to differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy.

AB - Background:: Evaluating the integrity of white matter tracts with diffusion tensor imaging may differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy. Methods:: Thirty-three prospectively recruited subjects had standardized evaluations and diffusion tensor imaging: 3 with primary lateral sclerosis who presented with features suggestive of progressive supranuclear palsy, 10 with probable or definite progressive supranuclear palsy, and 20 matched controls. We compared fractional anisotropy of the corticospinal tract, superior cerebellar peduncles, and body of the corpus callosum between groups. Results:: Both the primary lateral sclerosis and progressive supranuclear palsy subjects showed reduced fractional anisotropy in superior cerebellar peduncle and body of the corpus callosum compared with controls, but only primary lateral sclerosis subjects showed reductions in the corticospinal tracts. A ratio of corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle best distinguished the disorders (P <02). Conclusions:: The corticospinal tract/superior cerebellar peduncle ratio is a marker to differentiate primary lateral sclerosis from progressive supranuclear palsy.

KW - Diffusion tensor imaging

KW - Motor neuron disease

KW - Primary lateral sclerosis

KW - Progressive supranuclear palsy

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