Primary care physicians practicing preventive medicine in the outpatient setting

David Snipelisky, Kimberly Carter, Karna Sundsted, M. Caroline Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians’ perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. Methods: All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians’ perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians’ perception of patients’ response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Results: Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1%) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1–5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1–5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Conclusions: Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5
JournalInternational Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume2016-January
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Preventive Medicine
Primary Care Physicians
Outpatients
Primary Health Care
Medicine
Physicians
Physician's Role
Evidence-Based Medicine
Advisory Committees

Keywords

  • Preventive medicine
  • Primary care medicine
  • United states preventive services task force guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Primary care physicians practicing preventive medicine in the outpatient setting. / Snipelisky, David; Carter, Kimberly; Sundsted, Karna; Burton, M. Caroline.

In: International Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 2016-January, 5, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4d2dec50453045d6ae997455bb03e6b1,
title = "Primary care physicians practicing preventive medicine in the outpatient setting",
abstract = "Background: Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians’ perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. Methods: All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians’ perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians’ perception of patients’ response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Results: Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1{\%}) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1–5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1–5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Conclusions: Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations.",
keywords = "Preventive medicine, Primary care medicine, United states preventive services task force guidelines",
author = "David Snipelisky and Kimberly Carter and Karna Sundsted and Burton, {M. Caroline}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4103/2008-7802.173795",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2016-January",
journal = "International Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "2008-7802",
publisher = "Isfahan University of Medical Sciences(IUMS)",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Primary care physicians practicing preventive medicine in the outpatient setting

AU - Snipelisky, David

AU - Carter, Kimberly

AU - Sundsted, Karna

AU - Burton, M. Caroline

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Background: Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians’ perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. Methods: All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians’ perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians’ perception of patients’ response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Results: Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1%) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1–5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1–5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Conclusions: Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations.

AB - Background: Preventive care is an important part of primary care medicine, yet much variation in its practice exists. The aim of this study is to assess physicians’ perspectives of practicing preventive medicine and evaluate which topics are deemed most important. Methods: All primary care medicine providers at two separate academic medical centers (Mayo Clinic, MN and Mayo Clinic, FL) were surveyed via an E-mail questionnaire assessing physicians’ perception of the role of preventive medicine during both acute/routine and yearly visits, physicians’ perception of patients’ response to preventive medicine topics, and which preventive medicine topics are commonly practiced. Results: Of 445 providers meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 183 (41.1%) responded. Providers were more likely to engage patients in preventive medicine during yearly visits more so than acute visits (3.82 vs. 4.72, range 1–5 Likert Scale), yet providers were very likely to partake in such practices during both visits. Providers perceived that patients received the practice of preventive medicine very well (4.13 on 1–5 Likert Scale). No significant difference between provider practice and patient perception was noted between the two sites, although there was some variation based on clinical experience of the provider. Providers were found to most commonly practice topics recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Conclusions: Our study found a high predisposition to practicing preventive medicine. Providers seem to practice according to published evidence-based medicine recommendations.

KW - Preventive medicine

KW - Primary care medicine

KW - United states preventive services task force guidelines

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84954486260&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84954486260&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4103/2008-7802.173795

DO - 10.4103/2008-7802.173795

M3 - Article

VL - 2016-January

JO - International Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - International Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 2008-7802

M1 - 5

ER -