Preventing overestimation of pixels in computed tomography assessment of visceral fat

Aaron M. Potretzke, Kathryn H. Schmitz, Michael Dennis Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Computed tomography (CT) is a common research procedure for measuring abdominal fat distribution, but little is written about the software used to analyze images. Our objective was to compare in-house and commercially available software for quantitative measurement of abdominal fat distribution. In the process, we encountered some unexpected problems. Research Methods and Procedures: A total of 123 volunteers had single-slice abdominal CT images taken that were used to evaluate various aspects of the commercial image analysis program. Results: The agreement between the commercial and in-house programs was excellent (r = 0.996, p < 0.00,001) for both total and intraabdominal fat, and we were able to reduce between-observer variability in measured fat areas through the use of statistical handling of region of interest information. We also noted that intracolonic contents sometimes had the same Hounsfield units as adipose tissue. We analyzed single-slice CT images from 50 volunteers to determine the potential impact of this effect on visceral fat area; the overestimate of visceral fat area was 19 ± 22% (maximum, 112% overestimate). The commercial program could prevent this error, whereas our in-house program could not. Discussion: We concluded that a readily available commercial image analysis program compares well with a previously validated in-house program and that it offers some advantages with respect to preventing overestimation of pixels as visceral fat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1698-1701
Number of pages4
JournalObesity Research
Volume12
Issue number10
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

visceral fat
Intra-Abdominal Fat
computed tomography
Abdominal Fat
Tomography
abdominal fat
volunteers
Volunteers
Software
Fats
image analysis
research methods
lipids
Research
adipose tissue
Adipose Tissue

Keywords

  • Adipose tissue
  • Body composition
  • Computed tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Preventing overestimation of pixels in computed tomography assessment of visceral fat. / Potretzke, Aaron M.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Jensen, Michael Dennis.

In: Obesity Research, Vol. 12, No. 10, 2004, p. 1698-1701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Potretzke, Aaron M. ; Schmitz, Kathryn H. ; Jensen, Michael Dennis. / Preventing overestimation of pixels in computed tomography assessment of visceral fat. In: Obesity Research. 2004 ; Vol. 12, No. 10. pp. 1698-1701.
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