Prevalence of mental disorder in military children and adolescents: Findings from a two-stage community survey

P. S. Jensen, H. K. Watanabe, J. E. Richters, R. Cortes, M. Roper, S. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Because previous reports have suggested that children of military families are at greater risk for psychopathology, this study examines the levels of psychopathology in an epidemiological community sample of military children all living on a military post. Method: Standardized psychopathology rating scales and a structured diagnostic interview (the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children [DISC], version 2.1) were used in a multimethod, multistage survey; 294 six- to seventeen-year-old military children and their parents participated in the study. Results: Parent- and child-administered structured DSM-III-R DISC interviews indicated that children's levels of psychopathology were at levels consistent with studies of other normal samples. In addition, parents' and children's symptom checklist ratings of children were at national norms, as were parents' ratings of their own symptoms. Conclusions: Overall results do not support the notion that levels of psychopathology are greatly increased in military children. Further studies of military families should address the effects of rank and socioeconomic status, housing, and the current impact of life stressors on the parents as well as the children, in order to avoid drawing erroneous conclusions about parts or all of the military community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1514-1524
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume34
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mental Disorders
Psychopathology
Parents
Interviews
Appointments and Schedules
Surveys and Questionnaires
Checklist
Social Class
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

Keywords

  • Child Behavior Checklist
  • Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children
  • mental disorder
  • military children
  • military families
  • prevalence
  • psychopathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Prevalence of mental disorder in military children and adolescents : Findings from a two-stage community survey. / Jensen, P. S.; Watanabe, H. K.; Richters, J. E.; Cortes, R.; Roper, M.; Liu, S.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 34, No. 11, 1995, p. 1514-1524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jensen, P. S. ; Watanabe, H. K. ; Richters, J. E. ; Cortes, R. ; Roper, M. ; Liu, S. / Prevalence of mental disorder in military children and adolescents : Findings from a two-stage community survey. In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 1995 ; Vol. 34, No. 11. pp. 1514-1524.
@article{89c7b11778ad427abf2a801967e251a8,
title = "Prevalence of mental disorder in military children and adolescents: Findings from a two-stage community survey",
abstract = "Objective: Because previous reports have suggested that children of military families are at greater risk for psychopathology, this study examines the levels of psychopathology in an epidemiological community sample of military children all living on a military post. Method: Standardized psychopathology rating scales and a structured diagnostic interview (the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children [DISC], version 2.1) were used in a multimethod, multistage survey; 294 six- to seventeen-year-old military children and their parents participated in the study. Results: Parent- and child-administered structured DSM-III-R DISC interviews indicated that children's levels of psychopathology were at levels consistent with studies of other normal samples. In addition, parents' and children's symptom checklist ratings of children were at national norms, as were parents' ratings of their own symptoms. Conclusions: Overall results do not support the notion that levels of psychopathology are greatly increased in military children. Further studies of military families should address the effects of rank and socioeconomic status, housing, and the current impact of life stressors on the parents as well as the children, in order to avoid drawing erroneous conclusions about parts or all of the military community.",
keywords = "Child Behavior Checklist, Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, mental disorder, military children, military families, prevalence, psychopathology",
author = "Jensen, {P. S.} and Watanabe, {H. K.} and Richters, {J. E.} and R. Cortes and M. Roper and S. Liu",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "1514--1524",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry",
issn = "0890-8567",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of mental disorder in military children and adolescents

T2 - Findings from a two-stage community survey

AU - Jensen, P. S.

AU - Watanabe, H. K.

AU - Richters, J. E.

AU - Cortes, R.

AU - Roper, M.

AU - Liu, S.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Objective: Because previous reports have suggested that children of military families are at greater risk for psychopathology, this study examines the levels of psychopathology in an epidemiological community sample of military children all living on a military post. Method: Standardized psychopathology rating scales and a structured diagnostic interview (the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children [DISC], version 2.1) were used in a multimethod, multistage survey; 294 six- to seventeen-year-old military children and their parents participated in the study. Results: Parent- and child-administered structured DSM-III-R DISC interviews indicated that children's levels of psychopathology were at levels consistent with studies of other normal samples. In addition, parents' and children's symptom checklist ratings of children were at national norms, as were parents' ratings of their own symptoms. Conclusions: Overall results do not support the notion that levels of psychopathology are greatly increased in military children. Further studies of military families should address the effects of rank and socioeconomic status, housing, and the current impact of life stressors on the parents as well as the children, in order to avoid drawing erroneous conclusions about parts or all of the military community.

AB - Objective: Because previous reports have suggested that children of military families are at greater risk for psychopathology, this study examines the levels of psychopathology in an epidemiological community sample of military children all living on a military post. Method: Standardized psychopathology rating scales and a structured diagnostic interview (the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children [DISC], version 2.1) were used in a multimethod, multistage survey; 294 six- to seventeen-year-old military children and their parents participated in the study. Results: Parent- and child-administered structured DSM-III-R DISC interviews indicated that children's levels of psychopathology were at levels consistent with studies of other normal samples. In addition, parents' and children's symptom checklist ratings of children were at national norms, as were parents' ratings of their own symptoms. Conclusions: Overall results do not support the notion that levels of psychopathology are greatly increased in military children. Further studies of military families should address the effects of rank and socioeconomic status, housing, and the current impact of life stressors on the parents as well as the children, in order to avoid drawing erroneous conclusions about parts or all of the military community.

KW - Child Behavior Checklist

KW - Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children

KW - mental disorder

KW - military children

KW - military families

KW - prevalence

KW - psychopathology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028807184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028807184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8543520

AN - SCOPUS:0028807184

VL - 34

SP - 1514

EP - 1524

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SN - 0890-8567

IS - 11

ER -