Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients.

J. E. Anderson, K. B. Yim, M. D. Crowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD) in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients was assessed at a single center with a self-administered questionnaire previously used in a general population. It defines (GERD as the presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation, or both. Risk factors for GERD and GERD-associated symptoms were also evaluated. In the studied population, 29.7% of patients had frequent GERD (heartburn, acid regurgitation, or both symptoms weekly). Frequent GERD was reported by 44.7% of PD patients versus the 18.9% reported by HD patients and the 19.8% reported by the general population. PD and HD patients had similar GERD severity scores [2.3 +/- 0.7 vs 1.9 +/- 0.8, mean +/- standard deviation (SD)]. PD and HD patients reported atypical GERD symptoms at rates similar to those reported by the general population, but having GERD made some atypical GERD symptoms more likely (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). In a logistic model, age < 60 [odds ratio (OR) 5.6, confidence interval (CI) 1.5-21.3], smoking (OR 4.7, CI 1.3-16.9), and body mass index > or = 27 (OR 3.9, CI 1.2-13.0) predicted GERD. Sex, race, diabetes, PD, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium channel blockers, and coffee and alcohol use did not. GERD is more common in PD patients than in HD patients or in the general population. It is not clear whether PD per se is a risk factor for GERD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-78
Number of pages4
JournalAdvances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis
Volume15
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gastrointestinal Diseases
Peritoneal Dialysis
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Renal Dialysis
Heartburn
Population
Acids
Coffee
Calcium Channel Blockers
Anti-Inflammatory Agents

Cite this

Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients. / Anderson, J. E.; Yim, K. B.; Crowell, M. D.

In: Advances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis, Vol. 15, 1999, p. 75-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a943d6665e6541da86ecce49a8854a3f,
title = "Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients.",
abstract = "The prevalence of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD) in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients was assessed at a single center with a self-administered questionnaire previously used in a general population. It defines (GERD as the presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation, or both. Risk factors for GERD and GERD-associated symptoms were also evaluated. In the studied population, 29.7{\%} of patients had frequent GERD (heartburn, acid regurgitation, or both symptoms weekly). Frequent GERD was reported by 44.7{\%} of PD patients versus the 18.9{\%} reported by HD patients and the 19.8{\%} reported by the general population. PD and HD patients had similar GERD severity scores [2.3 +/- 0.7 vs 1.9 +/- 0.8, mean +/- standard deviation (SD)]. PD and HD patients reported atypical GERD symptoms at rates similar to those reported by the general population, but having GERD made some atypical GERD symptoms more likely (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). In a logistic model, age < 60 [odds ratio (OR) 5.6, confidence interval (CI) 1.5-21.3], smoking (OR 4.7, CI 1.3-16.9), and body mass index > or = 27 (OR 3.9, CI 1.2-13.0) predicted GERD. Sex, race, diabetes, PD, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium channel blockers, and coffee and alcohol use did not. GERD is more common in PD patients than in HD patients or in the general population. It is not clear whether PD per se is a risk factor for GERD.",
author = "Anderson, {J. E.} and Yim, {K. B.} and Crowell, {M. D.}",
year = "1999",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "75--78",
journal = "Advances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis",
issn = "1197-8554",
publisher = "Peritoneal Dialysis Bulletin",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients.

AU - Anderson, J. E.

AU - Yim, K. B.

AU - Crowell, M. D.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - The prevalence of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD) in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients was assessed at a single center with a self-administered questionnaire previously used in a general population. It defines (GERD as the presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation, or both. Risk factors for GERD and GERD-associated symptoms were also evaluated. In the studied population, 29.7% of patients had frequent GERD (heartburn, acid regurgitation, or both symptoms weekly). Frequent GERD was reported by 44.7% of PD patients versus the 18.9% reported by HD patients and the 19.8% reported by the general population. PD and HD patients had similar GERD severity scores [2.3 +/- 0.7 vs 1.9 +/- 0.8, mean +/- standard deviation (SD)]. PD and HD patients reported atypical GERD symptoms at rates similar to those reported by the general population, but having GERD made some atypical GERD symptoms more likely (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). In a logistic model, age < 60 [odds ratio (OR) 5.6, confidence interval (CI) 1.5-21.3], smoking (OR 4.7, CI 1.3-16.9), and body mass index > or = 27 (OR 3.9, CI 1.2-13.0) predicted GERD. Sex, race, diabetes, PD, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium channel blockers, and coffee and alcohol use did not. GERD is more common in PD patients than in HD patients or in the general population. It is not clear whether PD per se is a risk factor for GERD.

AB - The prevalence of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD) in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients was assessed at a single center with a self-administered questionnaire previously used in a general population. It defines (GERD as the presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation, or both. Risk factors for GERD and GERD-associated symptoms were also evaluated. In the studied population, 29.7% of patients had frequent GERD (heartburn, acid regurgitation, or both symptoms weekly). Frequent GERD was reported by 44.7% of PD patients versus the 18.9% reported by HD patients and the 19.8% reported by the general population. PD and HD patients had similar GERD severity scores [2.3 +/- 0.7 vs 1.9 +/- 0.8, mean +/- standard deviation (SD)]. PD and HD patients reported atypical GERD symptoms at rates similar to those reported by the general population, but having GERD made some atypical GERD symptoms more likely (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). In a logistic model, age < 60 [odds ratio (OR) 5.6, confidence interval (CI) 1.5-21.3], smoking (OR 4.7, CI 1.3-16.9), and body mass index > or = 27 (OR 3.9, CI 1.2-13.0) predicted GERD. Sex, race, diabetes, PD, non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium channel blockers, and coffee and alcohol use did not. GERD is more common in PD patients than in HD patients or in the general population. It is not clear whether PD per se is a risk factor for GERD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033249788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033249788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10682075

AN - SCOPUS:0033249788

VL - 15

SP - 75

EP - 78

JO - Advances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis

JF - Advances in peritoneal dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis

SN - 1197-8554

ER -