Prevalence of allergen sensitization detected by patch tests

Janice E. Ma, Nan Zhang, Rokea A. El-Azhary, Luz Fonacier, James A. Yiannias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Existing literature on the prevalence of positive reactions to allergens is largely derived from dermatologists who practice at large academic centers. Data from other providers, including allergists who practice in various other settings, is important to assess a more representative and accurate prevalence of contact allergy. Objective: To determine the prevalence of contact allergy among individuals with at least one positive patch test result by comparing data for positive patch test reaction rates of common contact allergens from 3 groups based in different practice settings, 2 of which are academic. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patch test results of an academic center (January 1, 2011, to December 4, 2015) and a national contact allergen database (March 1, 2015, to September 1, 2016). Data from a third, academic-based group was obtained separately from the published literature. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare positive reaction rates of the widely available, patch test allergens among the 3 groups. Results: The positive reaction rates for 10 of 36 compared allergens (28%) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the national contact allergen database compared with both the academic groups. Conclusion: Positive reaction rates to common allergens used in patch testing may be underreported in the literature. Limitations of our study included the retrospective nature of the study, different date ranges among the three groups, and the absence of all allergens tested by the national contact allergen database.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-244
Number of pages5
JournalAllergy and Asthma Proceedings
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Patch Tests
Allergens
Databases
Hypersensitivity
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Ma, J. E., Zhang, N., El-Azhary, R. A., Fonacier, L., & Yiannias, J. A. (2018). Prevalence of allergen sensitization detected by patch tests. Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, 39(3), 240-244. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4119

Prevalence of allergen sensitization detected by patch tests. / Ma, Janice E.; Zhang, Nan; El-Azhary, Rokea A.; Fonacier, Luz; Yiannias, James A.

In: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 240-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ma, JE, Zhang, N, El-Azhary, RA, Fonacier, L & Yiannias, JA 2018, 'Prevalence of allergen sensitization detected by patch tests', Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 240-244. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2018.39.4119
Ma, Janice E. ; Zhang, Nan ; El-Azhary, Rokea A. ; Fonacier, Luz ; Yiannias, James A. / Prevalence of allergen sensitization detected by patch tests. In: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 240-244.
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