Prevalence and correlates of dual tobacco use in cancer survivors

Margaret C. Fahey, Zoran Bursac, Jon Owen Ebbert, Robert C. Klesges, Melissa A. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Tobacco use in cancer survivors remains a significant problem, however, the use of non-cigarette tobacco products (NCTPs) in this population is less understood. This study examined prevalence and correlates of tobacco use among cancer survivors who were never, current, and former cigarette users. Tobacco-related behaviors and quitting attitudes were compared between survivors dually using cigarettes and electronic cigarettes (ECs) and cigarette-only users. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients at Mid-South cancer centers (n = 629; 50.4% never, 17.8% current, and 31.8% former cigarette users) responded to an anonymous questionnaire about tobacco-related behaviors and quitting attitudes. Results: Among current cigarette users, 27.7% reported using two or more tobacco products. Most commonly, 15.2% of cigarettes users were using ECs. Compared to cigarette only use, dual use of tobacco products was associated with male gender (p < 0.0001), being single (p = 0.009), and a lung cancer diagnosis (p < 0.0001). Dual users of cigarettes and ECs were more likely to report a readiness to quit cigarettes within 6 months (p = 0.0317) and that a physician recommended ECs as a quit resource (p = 0.0361) compared to cigarette-only users. Conclusions: Results suggest that using more than one tobacco product is common among cancer survivor cigarette users. Dual use of cigarettes and ECs was associated with an increased readiness for cigarette cessation and a physician recommendation of ECs. Targeting potential dual use of tobacco products, particularly cigarettes and ECs, might be beneficial for cigarette cessation among cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Causes and Control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Tobacco Use
Tobacco Products
Survivors
Neoplasms
Tobacco
Cross-Sectional Studies
Physicians

Keywords

  • Cigarette cessation
  • Dual tobacco use
  • Non-cigarette tobacco use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Prevalence and correlates of dual tobacco use in cancer survivors. / Fahey, Margaret C.; Bursac, Zoran; Ebbert, Jon Owen; Klesges, Robert C.; Little, Melissa A.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fahey, Margaret C. ; Bursac, Zoran ; Ebbert, Jon Owen ; Klesges, Robert C. ; Little, Melissa A. / Prevalence and correlates of dual tobacco use in cancer survivors. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2019.
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abstract = "Purpose: Tobacco use in cancer survivors remains a significant problem, however, the use of non-cigarette tobacco products (NCTPs) in this population is less understood. This study examined prevalence and correlates of tobacco use among cancer survivors who were never, current, and former cigarette users. Tobacco-related behaviors and quitting attitudes were compared between survivors dually using cigarettes and electronic cigarettes (ECs) and cigarette-only users. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients at Mid-South cancer centers (n = 629; 50.4{\%} never, 17.8{\%} current, and 31.8{\%} former cigarette users) responded to an anonymous questionnaire about tobacco-related behaviors and quitting attitudes. Results: Among current cigarette users, 27.7{\%} reported using two or more tobacco products. Most commonly, 15.2{\%} of cigarettes users were using ECs. Compared to cigarette only use, dual use of tobacco products was associated with male gender (p < 0.0001), being single (p = 0.009), and a lung cancer diagnosis (p < 0.0001). Dual users of cigarettes and ECs were more likely to report a readiness to quit cigarettes within 6 months (p = 0.0317) and that a physician recommended ECs as a quit resource (p = 0.0361) compared to cigarette-only users. Conclusions: Results suggest that using more than one tobacco product is common among cancer survivor cigarette users. Dual use of cigarettes and ECs was associated with an increased readiness for cigarette cessation and a physician recommendation of ECs. Targeting potential dual use of tobacco products, particularly cigarettes and ECs, might be beneficial for cigarette cessation among cancer survivors.",
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