Pressure rinsing of coronary stents immediately before implantation reduces inflammation and neointimal hyperplasia

Antoni Bayes-Genis, Allan R. Camrud, Michael Jorgenson, Janis Donovan, Kristin L. Shogren, David Holmes, Robert S. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates whether rinsing stents with high pressure immediately before implantation minimizes stent-induced inflammation and neointimal formation. BACKGROUND: Several reports indicate that manual stent manipulation before implantation results in foreign body contamination and increased neointimal hyperplasia. METHODS: A stent-cleaning chamber was developed to rinse stents at a sustained hydrodynamic pressure of 4 atm for 10 s. Commercial pre-mounted stents were examined with different levels of manipulation: 1) untouched stents: no stent manipulation before implantation; 2) handled stents: manual stent re-crimping on the balloon; 3) rinsed stents: pressure-rinsed with the stent-cleaning chamber. In vitro surface analysis was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation around stent struts were also assessed in the pig in-stent restenosis model. RESULTS: In vitro analysis revealed fewer contaminants on rinsed stents compared with untouched (p = 0.01) and handled stents (p < 0.001). In vivo, neointimal thickness, neointimal area and vessel percent stenosis were significantly reduced in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p = 0.002, p = 0.007, p = 0.008 respectively). In addition, a significant reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate around struts was observed in untouched, compared with handled, stents (p = 0.04) and in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p < 0.001). Regression analysis accounting for injury and neointimal thickness showed significant differences in slopes between "handled + not-rinsed" and "handled + rinsed" stents (p = 0.004), and between "untouched + not-rinsed" and "untouched + rinsed stents" (p = 0.037). CONCLUSIONS: Rinsing stents under high pressure immediately before coronary implantation results in less inflammation around struts and thinner neointima at 28 days in this pig model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-568
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2001

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Hyperplasia
Stents
Inflammation
Pressure
Swine
Neointima
Hydrodynamics
Foreign Bodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Pressure rinsing of coronary stents immediately before implantation reduces inflammation and neointimal hyperplasia. / Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Camrud, Allan R.; Jorgenson, Michael; Donovan, Janis; Shogren, Kristin L.; Holmes, David; Schwartz, Robert S.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 38, No. 2, 18.08.2001, p. 562-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bayes-Genis, Antoni ; Camrud, Allan R. ; Jorgenson, Michael ; Donovan, Janis ; Shogren, Kristin L. ; Holmes, David ; Schwartz, Robert S. / Pressure rinsing of coronary stents immediately before implantation reduces inflammation and neointimal hyperplasia. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2001 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 562-568.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates whether rinsing stents with high pressure immediately before implantation minimizes stent-induced inflammation and neointimal formation. BACKGROUND: Several reports indicate that manual stent manipulation before implantation results in foreign body contamination and increased neointimal hyperplasia. METHODS: A stent-cleaning chamber was developed to rinse stents at a sustained hydrodynamic pressure of 4 atm for 10 s. Commercial pre-mounted stents were examined with different levels of manipulation: 1) untouched stents: no stent manipulation before implantation; 2) handled stents: manual stent re-crimping on the balloon; 3) rinsed stents: pressure-rinsed with the stent-cleaning chamber. In vitro surface analysis was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation around stent struts were also assessed in the pig in-stent restenosis model. RESULTS: In vitro analysis revealed fewer contaminants on rinsed stents compared with untouched (p = 0.01) and handled stents (p < 0.001). In vivo, neointimal thickness, neointimal area and vessel percent stenosis were significantly reduced in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p = 0.002, p = 0.007, p = 0.008 respectively). In addition, a significant reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate around struts was observed in untouched, compared with handled, stents (p = 0.04) and in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p < 0.001). Regression analysis accounting for injury and neointimal thickness showed significant differences in slopes between {"}handled + not-rinsed{"} and {"}handled + rinsed{"} stents (p = 0.004), and between {"}untouched + not-rinsed{"} and {"}untouched + rinsed stents{"} (p = 0.037). CONCLUSIONS: Rinsing stents under high pressure immediately before coronary implantation results in less inflammation around struts and thinner neointima at 28 days in this pig model.",
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T1 - Pressure rinsing of coronary stents immediately before implantation reduces inflammation and neointimal hyperplasia

AU - Bayes-Genis, Antoni

AU - Camrud, Allan R.

AU - Jorgenson, Michael

AU - Donovan, Janis

AU - Shogren, Kristin L.

AU - Holmes, David

AU - Schwartz, Robert S.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates whether rinsing stents with high pressure immediately before implantation minimizes stent-induced inflammation and neointimal formation. BACKGROUND: Several reports indicate that manual stent manipulation before implantation results in foreign body contamination and increased neointimal hyperplasia. METHODS: A stent-cleaning chamber was developed to rinse stents at a sustained hydrodynamic pressure of 4 atm for 10 s. Commercial pre-mounted stents were examined with different levels of manipulation: 1) untouched stents: no stent manipulation before implantation; 2) handled stents: manual stent re-crimping on the balloon; 3) rinsed stents: pressure-rinsed with the stent-cleaning chamber. In vitro surface analysis was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation around stent struts were also assessed in the pig in-stent restenosis model. RESULTS: In vitro analysis revealed fewer contaminants on rinsed stents compared with untouched (p = 0.01) and handled stents (p < 0.001). In vivo, neointimal thickness, neointimal area and vessel percent stenosis were significantly reduced in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p = 0.002, p = 0.007, p = 0.008 respectively). In addition, a significant reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate around struts was observed in untouched, compared with handled, stents (p = 0.04) and in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p < 0.001). Regression analysis accounting for injury and neointimal thickness showed significant differences in slopes between "handled + not-rinsed" and "handled + rinsed" stents (p = 0.004), and between "untouched + not-rinsed" and "untouched + rinsed stents" (p = 0.037). CONCLUSIONS: Rinsing stents under high pressure immediately before coronary implantation results in less inflammation around struts and thinner neointima at 28 days in this pig model.

AB - OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates whether rinsing stents with high pressure immediately before implantation minimizes stent-induced inflammation and neointimal formation. BACKGROUND: Several reports indicate that manual stent manipulation before implantation results in foreign body contamination and increased neointimal hyperplasia. METHODS: A stent-cleaning chamber was developed to rinse stents at a sustained hydrodynamic pressure of 4 atm for 10 s. Commercial pre-mounted stents were examined with different levels of manipulation: 1) untouched stents: no stent manipulation before implantation; 2) handled stents: manual stent re-crimping on the balloon; 3) rinsed stents: pressure-rinsed with the stent-cleaning chamber. In vitro surface analysis was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation around stent struts were also assessed in the pig in-stent restenosis model. RESULTS: In vitro analysis revealed fewer contaminants on rinsed stents compared with untouched (p = 0.01) and handled stents (p < 0.001). In vivo, neointimal thickness, neointimal area and vessel percent stenosis were significantly reduced in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p = 0.002, p = 0.007, p = 0.008 respectively). In addition, a significant reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate around struts was observed in untouched, compared with handled, stents (p = 0.04) and in rinsed, compared with not-rinsed, stents (p < 0.001). Regression analysis accounting for injury and neointimal thickness showed significant differences in slopes between "handled + not-rinsed" and "handled + rinsed" stents (p = 0.004), and between "untouched + not-rinsed" and "untouched + rinsed stents" (p = 0.037). CONCLUSIONS: Rinsing stents under high pressure immediately before coronary implantation results in less inflammation around struts and thinner neointima at 28 days in this pig model.

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