Predictors of Postoperative Urinary Retention in Outpatient Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy

Sadikah Behbehani, Ritchie Delara, Johnny Yi, Katie Kunze, Elena Suarez-Salvador, Megan Wasson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study Objective: To identify risk factors associated with postoperative urinary retention in patients undergoing outpatient minimally invasive hysterectomy. Design: A retrospective cohort study. Setting: An academic medical center. Patients: All patients undergoing outpatient minimally invasive hysterectomy between January 2013 and July 2018 were considered for inclusion in the study. Interventions: Outpatient laparoscopic, vaginal, or robotically assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. Measurements and Main Results: Four hundred forty-four patients met the inclusion criteria. Postoperative urinary retention occurred in 94 patients, and 347 patients successfully passed their voiding trial in the postanesthesia care unit for a pass rate of 79%. Demographic characteristics were similar, except patients who experienced postoperative urinary retention were less likely to be menopausal (23.4% vs 34.7%, p =.038). Those with urinary retention received more perioperative opioids (morphine milligram equivalent of 14.4 mg vs11.2 mg, p =.012), had longer operative times (122.9 ± 55.6 vs 95.7 ± 42.3 minutes, p <.01), and experienced more blood loss (105.3 ± 134.4 vs 78.5 ± 86.8 mL, p =.025). The rate of urinary tract infections was similar. Logistic regression analysis showed that the route of hysterectomy and age were not associated with an increased risk for urinary retention, whereas a longer operative time and higher doses of perioperative opioid use were. Conclusion: In patients undergoing minimally invasive outpatient hysterectomy, a longer operative time and increased perioperative narcotic use increases the risk of postoperative urinary retention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Urinary Retention
Hysterectomy
Outpatients
Operative Time
Opioid Analgesics
Narcotics
Urinary Tract Infections
Morphine
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • Minimally invasive hysterectomy
  • Outpatient hysterectomy
  • Urinary retention
  • Voiding trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Predictors of Postoperative Urinary Retention in Outpatient Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy. / Behbehani, Sadikah; Delara, Ritchie; Yi, Johnny; Kunze, Katie; Suarez-Salvador, Elena; Wasson, Megan.

In: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Behbehani, Sadikah ; Delara, Ritchie ; Yi, Johnny ; Kunze, Katie ; Suarez-Salvador, Elena ; Wasson, Megan. / Predictors of Postoperative Urinary Retention in Outpatient Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy. In: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. 2019.
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