Predictors of interindividual variation in ambulatory blood pressure and their time or activity dependence

Gary L. Schwartz, Stephen T. Turner, Jason H. Moore, Charles F. Sing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine whether total interindividual variation in blood pressure (BP) differs between inactive and active hours of the day, to identify predictors of interindividual variation in BP, and to assess whether variation associated with any of these identified predictors is greater (or less) during inactive hours than during active hours of the day. We obtained ambulatory BP recordings over 20 consecutive hours (12 active, out of bed [daytime]; and 8 inactive, in bed [nighttime]) in a sample of 240 unrelated, non-Hispanic white adults (138 men; 102 women). We estimated total interindividual variation in BP, and the percentage of interindividual variation associated with measures of age and body size, metabolic traits, catecholamines, erythrocyte cation transport, and renal function. We used linear regression to assess changes in the hourly estimates of total interindividual variation and in variation attributable to each set of predictor traits over the 20 h. In both men and women, total interindividual variation in systolic BP was significantly greater (not less) during inactive hours than during active hours. In addition, in women, total interindividual variation in diastolic BP was as great during inactive hours as during active hours. Each set of traits considered predicted a statistically significant percentage of interindividual variation in BP. None of the sets of traits predicted a greater percentage of interindividual variation during the inactive hours than during the active hours. Measures of age and body size, catecholamines, cation transport and renal function traits predicted significantly less interindividual variation during inactive hours than during active hours of the day. That total interindividual variation in BP is as great or greater during inactive hours than during active hours of the day emphasizes the potential for differences in nighttime BP to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. In as much as the predictors of interindividual variation in BP differ between the daytime and nighttime, the causes of variation during these two times may also differ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-60
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of hypertension
Volume13
Issue number1 II SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Clinical studies
  • Predictors of variation
  • Time or activity dependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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