Predictors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation reduction in response to daily azithromycin therapy

MeiLan K. Han, Nabihah Tayob, Susan Murray, Mark T. Dransfield, George Washko, Paul D Scanlon, Gerard J. Criner, Richard Casaburi, John Connett, Stephen C. Lazarus, Richard Albert, Prescott Woodruff, Fernando J. Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Daily azithromycin decreases acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), but long-term side effects are unknown. Objectives: To identify the types of exacerbations most likely to be reduced and clinical subgroups most likely to benefit from azithromycin, 250 mg daily, added to usual care. Methods: Enrollment criteria included irreversible airflow limitation and AECOPD requiring corticosteroids, emergency department visit, or hospitalization in the prior year or use of supplemental oxygen. Recurrent events and cumulative incidence analyses compared treatment received for AECOPD by randomization group, strati fied by subgroups of interest. Cox proportional hazards models estimated treatment effects in subgroups adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, FEV1 % predicted, concomitant COPD medications, and oxygen use. Measurements and Main Results: Azithromycin was most effective in reducing AECOPD requiring both antibiotic and steroid treatment (n = 1,113; cumulative incidence analysis, P = 0.0002; recurrent events analysis, P = 0.002). No difference in treatment response by sex (P = 0.75), presence of chronic bronchitis (P = 0.19), concomitant inhaled therapy (P = 0.29), or supplemental oxygen use (P = 0.23) was observed. Older age and milder Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage were associated with better treatment response (P = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). A significant interactionbetweentreatment andcurrent smokingwas seen(P =0.03) and azithromycin did not reduce exacerbations in current smokers (hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.38; P = 0.95). Conclusions: Azithromycin is most effective in preventing AECOPD requiring both antibiotic and steroid treatment. Adjusting for confounders, we saw no difference in ef ficacy by sex, history of chronic bronchitis, oxygen use, or concomitant COPD therapy. Greater efficacy was seen in older patients and milder Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages. We found little evidence of treatment effect among current smokers. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT0011986 and NCT00325897).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1503-1508
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume189
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2014

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Azithromycin
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Disease Progression
Oxygen
Therapeutics
Chronic Bronchitis
Steroids
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Incidence
Random Allocation
Proportional Hazards Models
Hospital Emergency Service
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Hospitalization
Smoking
Clinical Trials
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Azithromycin
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Exacerbation
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Predictors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation reduction in response to daily azithromycin therapy. / Han, MeiLan K.; Tayob, Nabihah; Murray, Susan; Dransfield, Mark T.; Washko, George; Scanlon, Paul D; Criner, Gerard J.; Casaburi, Richard; Connett, John; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Albert, Richard; Woodruff, Prescott; Martinez, Fernando J.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 189, No. 12, 15.06.2014, p. 1503-1508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Han, MK, Tayob, N, Murray, S, Dransfield, MT, Washko, G, Scanlon, PD, Criner, GJ, Casaburi, R, Connett, J, Lazarus, SC, Albert, R, Woodruff, P & Martinez, FJ 2014, 'Predictors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation reduction in response to daily azithromycin therapy', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 189, no. 12, pp. 1503-1508. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201402-0207OC
Han, MeiLan K. ; Tayob, Nabihah ; Murray, Susan ; Dransfield, Mark T. ; Washko, George ; Scanlon, Paul D ; Criner, Gerard J. ; Casaburi, Richard ; Connett, John ; Lazarus, Stephen C. ; Albert, Richard ; Woodruff, Prescott ; Martinez, Fernando J. / Predictors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation reduction in response to daily azithromycin therapy. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 189, No. 12. pp. 1503-1508.
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abstract = "Rationale: Daily azithromycin decreases acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), but long-term side effects are unknown. Objectives: To identify the types of exacerbations most likely to be reduced and clinical subgroups most likely to benefit from azithromycin, 250 mg daily, added to usual care. Methods: Enrollment criteria included irreversible airflow limitation and AECOPD requiring corticosteroids, emergency department visit, or hospitalization in the prior year or use of supplemental oxygen. Recurrent events and cumulative incidence analyses compared treatment received for AECOPD by randomization group, strati fied by subgroups of interest. Cox proportional hazards models estimated treatment effects in subgroups adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, FEV1 {\%} predicted, concomitant COPD medications, and oxygen use. Measurements and Main Results: Azithromycin was most effective in reducing AECOPD requiring both antibiotic and steroid treatment (n = 1,113; cumulative incidence analysis, P = 0.0002; recurrent events analysis, P = 0.002). No difference in treatment response by sex (P = 0.75), presence of chronic bronchitis (P = 0.19), concomitant inhaled therapy (P = 0.29), or supplemental oxygen use (P = 0.23) was observed. Older age and milder Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage were associated with better treatment response (P = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). A significant interactionbetweentreatment andcurrent smokingwas seen(P =0.03) and azithromycin did not reduce exacerbations in current smokers (hazard ratio, 0.99; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.71-1.38; P = 0.95). Conclusions: Azithromycin is most effective in preventing AECOPD requiring both antibiotic and steroid treatment. Adjusting for confounders, we saw no difference in ef ficacy by sex, history of chronic bronchitis, oxygen use, or concomitant COPD therapy. Greater efficacy was seen in older patients and milder Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages. We found little evidence of treatment effect among current smokers. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT0011986 and NCT00325897).",
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N2 - Rationale: Daily azithromycin decreases acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), but long-term side effects are unknown. Objectives: To identify the types of exacerbations most likely to be reduced and clinical subgroups most likely to benefit from azithromycin, 250 mg daily, added to usual care. Methods: Enrollment criteria included irreversible airflow limitation and AECOPD requiring corticosteroids, emergency department visit, or hospitalization in the prior year or use of supplemental oxygen. Recurrent events and cumulative incidence analyses compared treatment received for AECOPD by randomization group, strati fied by subgroups of interest. Cox proportional hazards models estimated treatment effects in subgroups adjusted for age, sex, smoking status, FEV1 % predicted, concomitant COPD medications, and oxygen use. Measurements and Main Results: Azithromycin was most effective in reducing AECOPD requiring both antibiotic and steroid treatment (n = 1,113; cumulative incidence analysis, P = 0.0002; recurrent events analysis, P = 0.002). No difference in treatment response by sex (P = 0.75), presence of chronic bronchitis (P = 0.19), concomitant inhaled therapy (P = 0.29), or supplemental oxygen use (P = 0.23) was observed. Older age and milder Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage were associated with better treatment response (P = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). A significant interactionbetweentreatment andcurrent smokingwas seen(P =0.03) and azithromycin did not reduce exacerbations in current smokers (hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-1.38; P = 0.95). Conclusions: Azithromycin is most effective in preventing AECOPD requiring both antibiotic and steroid treatment. Adjusting for confounders, we saw no difference in ef ficacy by sex, history of chronic bronchitis, oxygen use, or concomitant COPD therapy. Greater efficacy was seen in older patients and milder Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages. We found little evidence of treatment effect among current smokers. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT0011986 and NCT00325897).

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