Predictive value of transcutaneous oxygen pressure and amputation success by use of supine and elevation measurements

J. Michael Bacharach, Thom W. Rooke, Philip J. Osmundson, Peter Gloviczki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if transcutaneous oxygen pressure (tcPo2) measurements can be used to predict amputation site healing in lower limbs with arterial occlusive disease. We measured tcPo2 (supine and with limb elevation) in 90 limbs before amputation and reviewed their subsequent clinical course. Of these, 52 (57%) successfully healed, 21 (23%) failed, and 17 (18%) exhibited delayed healing. Limbs with delayed healing or failure had significantly lower tcPo2 values than values of those that healed. A tcPo2 ≥ 40 torr was associated with primary or delayed healing in 51 of 52 limbs (98%), and a tcPo2 value of < 20 torr was universally associated with failure. For patients with a tcPo2 between 20 and 40 torr, tcPo2 measurements obtained during limb elevation improved the predictability of outcome. We conclude that supine tcPo2 measurements can help predict amputation site healing, and that tcPo2 measurement during limb elevation improves predictability in limbs with borderline supine tcPo2 values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-563
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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