Prediction of mortality in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy by clinical, exercise stress, and echocardiographic data

Abdou Elhendy, Karen M. Modesto, Douglas W. Mahoney, Bijoy K. Khandheria, James B. Seward, Patricia Pellikka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the clinical, exercise stress test, and echocardiographic predictors of mortality and cardiac events in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Symptom-limited treadmill exercise echocardiography was performed for evaluation of coronary artery disease in 483 patients (age, 66 ± 11 years; 281 men) with LVH. End points during follow-up were all-cause mortality and hard cardiac events (cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI]). RESULTS: Forty-six patients died and 14 had nonfatal MI. The cumulative mortality rate was higher in patients with abnormal exercise echocardiography (3% vs. 0.4% at one year, 11.7% vs. 3.7% at three years, and 18.3% vs. 9.5% at five years, p < 0.001). In a sequential multivariate analysis model of clinical, exercise test, and rest and exercise echocardiographic data, incremental predictors of mortality were workload (hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), rate pressure product (HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9), left ventricular (LV) mass index (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8), and failure to increase ejection fraction (EF) with exercise (HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.8). Predictors of cardiac events were history of coronary artery bypass grafting (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.4), lower exercise rate-pressure product (HR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8), resting wall motion score index (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8), and failure to increase EF with exercise (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 6.9). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with LVH, LV mass index and EF response to exercise are independent predictors of mortality, incremental to clinical and exercise test data and resting LV function. A normal exercise echocardiogram predicts a relatively low mortality rate during the following three years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-135
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Mortality
Exercise Test
Echocardiography
Myocardial Infarction
Pressure
Workload
Left Ventricular Function
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease
Multivariate Analysis
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Prediction of mortality in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy by clinical, exercise stress, and echocardiographic data. / Elhendy, Abdou; Modesto, Karen M.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Khandheria, Bijoy K.; Seward, James B.; Pellikka, Patricia.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 129-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elhendy, Abdou ; Modesto, Karen M. ; Mahoney, Douglas W. ; Khandheria, Bijoy K. ; Seward, James B. ; Pellikka, Patricia. / Prediction of mortality in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy by clinical, exercise stress, and echocardiographic data. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2003 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 129-135.
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AU - Elhendy, Abdou

AU - Modesto, Karen M.

AU - Mahoney, Douglas W.

AU - Khandheria, Bijoy K.

AU - Seward, James B.

AU - Pellikka, Patricia

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the clinical, exercise stress test, and echocardiographic predictors of mortality and cardiac events in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Symptom-limited treadmill exercise echocardiography was performed for evaluation of coronary artery disease in 483 patients (age, 66 ± 11 years; 281 men) with LVH. End points during follow-up were all-cause mortality and hard cardiac events (cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI]). RESULTS: Forty-six patients died and 14 had nonfatal MI. The cumulative mortality rate was higher in patients with abnormal exercise echocardiography (3% vs. 0.4% at one year, 11.7% vs. 3.7% at three years, and 18.3% vs. 9.5% at five years, p < 0.001). In a sequential multivariate analysis model of clinical, exercise test, and rest and exercise echocardiographic data, incremental predictors of mortality were workload (hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), rate pressure product (HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9), left ventricular (LV) mass index (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8), and failure to increase ejection fraction (EF) with exercise (HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.8). Predictors of cardiac events were history of coronary artery bypass grafting (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.4), lower exercise rate-pressure product (HR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8), resting wall motion score index (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8), and failure to increase EF with exercise (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 6.9). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with LVH, LV mass index and EF response to exercise are independent predictors of mortality, incremental to clinical and exercise test data and resting LV function. A normal exercise echocardiogram predicts a relatively low mortality rate during the following three years.

AB - OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the clinical, exercise stress test, and echocardiographic predictors of mortality and cardiac events in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Symptom-limited treadmill exercise echocardiography was performed for evaluation of coronary artery disease in 483 patients (age, 66 ± 11 years; 281 men) with LVH. End points during follow-up were all-cause mortality and hard cardiac events (cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI]). RESULTS: Forty-six patients died and 14 had nonfatal MI. The cumulative mortality rate was higher in patients with abnormal exercise echocardiography (3% vs. 0.4% at one year, 11.7% vs. 3.7% at three years, and 18.3% vs. 9.5% at five years, p < 0.001). In a sequential multivariate analysis model of clinical, exercise test, and rest and exercise echocardiographic data, incremental predictors of mortality were workload (hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), rate pressure product (HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9), left ventricular (LV) mass index (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8), and failure to increase ejection fraction (EF) with exercise (HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.8). Predictors of cardiac events were history of coronary artery bypass grafting (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.4), lower exercise rate-pressure product (HR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8), resting wall motion score index (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.8), and failure to increase EF with exercise (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 6.9). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with LVH, LV mass index and EF response to exercise are independent predictors of mortality, incremental to clinical and exercise test data and resting LV function. A normal exercise echocardiogram predicts a relatively low mortality rate during the following three years.

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