Predicting access to postoperative treatment after glioblastoma resection: an analysis of neighborhood-level disadvantage using the Area Deprivation Index (ADI)

Krissia M. Rivera Perla, Oliver Y. Tang, Shayla N.M. Durfey, Tito Vivas-Buitrago, Wendy J. Sherman, Ian Parney, Joon Uhm, Alyx B Porter Umphrey, Heinrich Elinzano, Steven A. Toms, Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Social determinants of health (SDoH)—socioeconomic and environmental factors—impact outcomes. The Area Deprivation Index (ADI), a composite of seventeen SDoH factors, has been correlated with poorer outcomes. We aimed to compare outcomes and treatment access for glioblastoma, a universally fatal malignant brain tumor, in patients more (ADI 34–100%) versus less disadvantaged (ADI 0–33%). Methods: A 5-year retrospective study of Rhode Island Hospital and Mayo Clinic databases was conducted from 2012 to 2017 for patients ≥ 18 years with glioblastoma. Patient addresses were matched to ADI percentiles and grouped into more (top 66% ADI) and less disadvantaged. Adjusted multivariable regressions were used to compare outcomes between groups. Results: A total of 434 patients met inclusion; 92.9% were insured, 56.2% were more disadvantaged (n = 244), and the more disadvantaged cohort was younger on average (62 years). After adjustment, the more disadvantaged group had decreased odds of receiving gross total resection (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.43, 95% CI [0.27–0.68]; p < 0.001). This cohort also had decreased odds of undergoing chemotherapy (aOR 0.51[0.26–0.98]), radiation (aOR 0.39[0.20–0.77]), chemoradiation (aOR 0.42[0.23–0.77]), tumor-treating fields (aOR 0.39[0.16–0.93]), and clinical trial participation (aOR 0.47[0.25–0.91]). No differences in length of survival or postoperative Karnofsky Performance Status Scale were observed. Conclusion: More disadvantaged glioblastoma patients had decreased odds of receiving gross total resection. They also exhibited decreased odds of receiving standard of care like chemoradiation as well as participating in a clinical trial, compared to the less disadvantaged group. More research is needed to identify modifiable SDoH barriers to post-operative treatment in disadvantaged patients with glioblastoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of neuro-oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Area Deprivation Index
  • Glioma
  • Social determinants of health
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cancer Research

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