Practice quality improvement during residency: Where do we stand and where can we improve?

Sadia Choudhery, Michael Richter, Alvin Anene, Yin Xi, Travis Browning, David Chason, Michael Craig Morriss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives: Completing a systems-based practice project, equivalent to a practice quality improvement project (PQI), is a residency requirement by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and an American Board of Radiology milestone. The aim of this study was to assess the residents' perspectives on quality improvement projects in radiology. Materials and Methods: Survey data were collected from 154 trainee members of the Association of University Radiologists to evaluate the residents' views on PQI. Results: Most residents were aware of the requirement of completing a PQI project and had faculty mentors for their projects. Residents who thought it was difficult to find a mentor were more likely to start their project later in residency (P<.0001). Publication rates were low overall, and lack of time was considered the greatest obstacle. Having dedicated time for a PQI project was associated with increased likelihood of publishing or presenting the data (P=.0091). Residents who rated the five surveyed PQI steps (coming up with an idea, finding a mentor, designing a project, finding resources, and finding time) as difficult steps were more likely to not have initiated a PQI project (P<.0001 for the first four and P=.0046 for time). Conclusion: We present five practical areas of improvement to make PQI a valuable learning experience: 1) Increasing awareness of PQI and providing ideas for projects, 2) encouraging faculty mentorship and publication, 3) educating residents about project design and implementation, 4) providing resources such as books and funds, and 5) allowing dedicated time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)851-858
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic radiology
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Internship and Residency
Quality Improvement
Mentors
Radiology
Publications
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Financial Management
Learning

Keywords

  • Core competency
  • Maintenance of certification
  • Milestones
  • Practice quality improvement
  • Systems-based practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Choudhery, S., Richter, M., Anene, A., Xi, Y., Browning, T., Chason, D., & Morriss, M. C. (2014). Practice quality improvement during residency: Where do we stand and where can we improve? Academic radiology, 21(7), 851-858. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2013.11.021

Practice quality improvement during residency : Where do we stand and where can we improve? / Choudhery, Sadia; Richter, Michael; Anene, Alvin; Xi, Yin; Browning, Travis; Chason, David; Morriss, Michael Craig.

In: Academic radiology, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.01.2014, p. 851-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choudhery, S, Richter, M, Anene, A, Xi, Y, Browning, T, Chason, D & Morriss, MC 2014, 'Practice quality improvement during residency: Where do we stand and where can we improve?', Academic radiology, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 851-858. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2013.11.021
Choudhery, Sadia ; Richter, Michael ; Anene, Alvin ; Xi, Yin ; Browning, Travis ; Chason, David ; Morriss, Michael Craig. / Practice quality improvement during residency : Where do we stand and where can we improve?. In: Academic radiology. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 851-858.
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