Practice effects and longitudinal cognitive change in clinically normal older adults differ by Alzheimer imaging biomarker status

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine practice effects and longitudinal cognitive change in 190 clinically normal elderly classified according to a two-feature biomarker model for Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: All participants completed neuropsychological testing, MRI, FDG-PET, and PiB-PET at their baseline evaluation. We divided participants into four groups based on neuroimaging measures of amyloid (A+ or A−) and neurodegeneration (N+ or N−) and reexamined cognition at 15- and 30-month intervals. Results: The A−N− group showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores. The A+N− group also showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores as well as attention. The A−N+ group showed a significant decline in attention at 30 months. The A+N+ group showed significant improvements in memory and the global score at 15 months followed by a significant decline in the global score at 30 months. Conclusion: Amyloidosis in the absence of neurodegeneration did not have an adverse impact on practice effects or the 30-month cognitive trajectories. In contrast, participants with neurodegeneration (either A−N+ or A+N+) had worse performance at the 30-month follow-up. Our results show that neurodegeneration has a more deleterious effect on cognition than amyloidosis in clinically normal individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 9 2016

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
Amyloidosis
Cognition
Amyloid
Neuroimaging
Alzheimer Disease
Practice (Psychology)
Imaging
Alzheimer

Keywords

  • amyloid
  • Cognition
  • FDG-PET
  • neurodegeneration
  • PiB-PET
  • practice effects
  • preclinical Alzheimer’s disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Practice effects and longitudinal cognitive change in clinically normal older adults differ by Alzheimer imaging biomarker status",
abstract = "Objective: The objective of this study was to examine practice effects and longitudinal cognitive change in 190 clinically normal elderly classified according to a two-feature biomarker model for Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: All participants completed neuropsychological testing, MRI, FDG-PET, and PiB-PET at their baseline evaluation. We divided participants into four groups based on neuroimaging measures of amyloid (A+ or A−) and neurodegeneration (N+ or N−) and reexamined cognition at 15- and 30-month intervals. Results: The A−N− group showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores. The A+N− group also showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores as well as attention. The A−N+ group showed a significant decline in attention at 30 months. The A+N+ group showed significant improvements in memory and the global score at 15 months followed by a significant decline in the global score at 30 months. Conclusion: Amyloidosis in the absence of neurodegeneration did not have an adverse impact on practice effects or the 30-month cognitive trajectories. In contrast, participants with neurodegeneration (either A−N+ or A+N+) had worse performance at the 30-month follow-up. Our results show that neurodegeneration has a more deleterious effect on cognition than amyloidosis in clinically normal individuals.",
keywords = "amyloid, Cognition, FDG-PET, neurodegeneration, PiB-PET, practice effects, preclinical Alzheimer’s disease",
author = "Machulda, {Mary Margaret} and Hagen, {Clint E.} and Wiste, {Heather J.} and Mielke, {Michelle M} and Knopman, {David S} and Roberts, {Rosebud O} and Vemuri, {Prashanthi D} and Val Lowe and Jack, {Clifford R Jr.} and Petersen, {Ronald Carl}",
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AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret

AU - Hagen, Clint E.

AU - Wiste, Heather J.

AU - Mielke, Michelle M

AU - Knopman, David S

AU - Roberts, Rosebud O

AU - Vemuri, Prashanthi D

AU - Lowe, Val

AU - Jack, Clifford R Jr.

AU - Petersen, Ronald Carl

PY - 2016/10/9

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N2 - Objective: The objective of this study was to examine practice effects and longitudinal cognitive change in 190 clinically normal elderly classified according to a two-feature biomarker model for Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: All participants completed neuropsychological testing, MRI, FDG-PET, and PiB-PET at their baseline evaluation. We divided participants into four groups based on neuroimaging measures of amyloid (A+ or A−) and neurodegeneration (N+ or N−) and reexamined cognition at 15- and 30-month intervals. Results: The A−N− group showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores. The A+N− group also showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores as well as attention. The A−N+ group showed a significant decline in attention at 30 months. The A+N+ group showed significant improvements in memory and the global score at 15 months followed by a significant decline in the global score at 30 months. Conclusion: Amyloidosis in the absence of neurodegeneration did not have an adverse impact on practice effects or the 30-month cognitive trajectories. In contrast, participants with neurodegeneration (either A−N+ or A+N+) had worse performance at the 30-month follow-up. Our results show that neurodegeneration has a more deleterious effect on cognition than amyloidosis in clinically normal individuals.

AB - Objective: The objective of this study was to examine practice effects and longitudinal cognitive change in 190 clinically normal elderly classified according to a two-feature biomarker model for Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: All participants completed neuropsychological testing, MRI, FDG-PET, and PiB-PET at their baseline evaluation. We divided participants into four groups based on neuroimaging measures of amyloid (A+ or A−) and neurodegeneration (N+ or N−) and reexamined cognition at 15- and 30-month intervals. Results: The A−N− group showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores. The A+N− group also showed significant improvements in the memory and global scores as well as attention. The A−N+ group showed a significant decline in attention at 30 months. The A+N+ group showed significant improvements in memory and the global score at 15 months followed by a significant decline in the global score at 30 months. Conclusion: Amyloidosis in the absence of neurodegeneration did not have an adverse impact on practice effects or the 30-month cognitive trajectories. In contrast, participants with neurodegeneration (either A−N+ or A+N+) had worse performance at the 30-month follow-up. Our results show that neurodegeneration has a more deleterious effect on cognition than amyloidosis in clinically normal individuals.

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