Postcolonoscopy followup recommendations: Comparison with and without use of polyp pathology

Shiva K. Ratuapli, Suryakanth R. Gurudu, Mary A. Atia, Michael D. Crowell, Sarah B. Umar, M. Edwyn Harrison, Jonathan A Leighton, Francisco C Ramirez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Appropriate recommendations for a followup exam after an index colonoscopy are an important quality indicator. Lack of knowledge of polyp pathology at the time of colonoscopy may be one reason that followup recommendations are not made. Aim. To describe and compare the accuracy of followup recommendations made at colonoscopy based on the size and number of polyps with recommendations made at a later date based on actual polyp pathology. Methods. All patients who underwent screening and surveillance colonoscopy from March, 2012, to August, 2012, were included. Surveillance recommendations from the endoscopy reports were graded as "accurate" or "not accurate" based on the postpolypectomy surveillance guidelines established by US Multisociety Task Force on Colon Cancer. Polyp pathology was then used to regrade the surveillance recommendations. Results. Followup recommendations were accurate in 759/884 (86%) of the study colonoscopies, based upon size and number of polyps with the assumption that all polyps were adenomatous. After incorporating actual polyp pathology, 717/884 (81%) colonoscopies had accurate recommendations. Conclusion. In our practice, the knowledge of actual polyp pathology does not change the surveillance recommendations made at the time of colonoscopy in the majority of patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number683491
JournalDiagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Colonoscopy
Polyps
Pathology
Adenomatous Polyps
Advisory Committees
Colonic Neoplasms
Endoscopy
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Postcolonoscopy followup recommendations : Comparison with and without use of polyp pathology. / Ratuapli, Shiva K.; Gurudu, Suryakanth R.; Atia, Mary A.; Crowell, Michael D.; Umar, Sarah B.; Harrison, M. Edwyn; Leighton, Jonathan A; Ramirez, Francisco C.

In: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy, Vol. 2014, 683491, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ratuapli, Shiva K. ; Gurudu, Suryakanth R. ; Atia, Mary A. ; Crowell, Michael D. ; Umar, Sarah B. ; Harrison, M. Edwyn ; Leighton, Jonathan A ; Ramirez, Francisco C. / Postcolonoscopy followup recommendations : Comparison with and without use of polyp pathology. In: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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abstract = "Background. Appropriate recommendations for a followup exam after an index colonoscopy are an important quality indicator. Lack of knowledge of polyp pathology at the time of colonoscopy may be one reason that followup recommendations are not made. Aim. To describe and compare the accuracy of followup recommendations made at colonoscopy based on the size and number of polyps with recommendations made at a later date based on actual polyp pathology. Methods. All patients who underwent screening and surveillance colonoscopy from March, 2012, to August, 2012, were included. Surveillance recommendations from the endoscopy reports were graded as {"}accurate{"} or {"}not accurate{"} based on the postpolypectomy surveillance guidelines established by US Multisociety Task Force on Colon Cancer. Polyp pathology was then used to regrade the surveillance recommendations. Results. Followup recommendations were accurate in 759/884 (86{\%}) of the study colonoscopies, based upon size and number of polyps with the assumption that all polyps were adenomatous. After incorporating actual polyp pathology, 717/884 (81{\%}) colonoscopies had accurate recommendations. Conclusion. In our practice, the knowledge of actual polyp pathology does not change the surveillance recommendations made at the time of colonoscopy in the majority of patients.",
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