Population-Based Trends in Amputations and Revascularizations for Peripheral Artery Disease From 1990 to 2009

Jeffrey J. Nienaber, Carin Y. Smith, Stephen Cha, Mateus Correa, Phillip G. Rowse, Kent R. Bailey, Manju Kalra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine trends in amputations and revascularizations for peripheral artery disease (PAD) in a well-defined population. Methods: A population-based cohort study of Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents with PAD undergoing amputation or revascularization was conducted between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2009. Population-level 5-year incidence trends for endovascular, open surgical, and hybrid revascularizations and major and minor amputations were determined. Limb-specific outcomes after revascularization, including major adverse limb events and amputation-free survival, were compared between initial surgical and endovascular or hybrid revascularization groups using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: We identified 773 residents who underwent 1906 limb-procedures, including 689 open revascularizations, 685 endovascular or hybrid revascularizations, and 220 major amputations. During the 20-year study period, the incidence of endovascular and hybrid revascularizations increased, whereas the incidence of open surgical revascularizations and major amputations decreased. Incidence of revascularizations for chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) did not change. Among residents with CLTI undergoing their first revascularization on a limb, endovascular revascularization was associated with more major adverse limb events and major amputations compared with surgical revascularization during the ensuing 15 years. Conclusion: The rising incidence of endovascular and hybrid revascularizations and the decreasing incidence of open surgical revascularizations for PAD were associated with a decreasing incidence of major amputations in this population between 1990 and 2009, despite a stable incidence of revascularizations for CLTI. With more major adverse limb events and major amputations after endovascular revascularization, these trends suggest that additional emphasis should be placed on improving limb salvage efforts beyond just mode of revascularization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)919-930
Number of pages12
JournalMayo Clinic proceedings
Volume97
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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