Polyunsaturated fatty acids and reduced odds of MCI: The mayo clinic study of aging

Rosebud O Roberts, James R Cerhan, Yonas Endale Geda, David S Knopman, Ruth H. Cha, Teresa J H Christianson, V. Shane Pankratz, Robert J. Ivnik, Helen M. O'Connor, Ronald Carl Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, PUFA) have been associated with a reduced risk of dementia. The association of these fatty acids with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is not fully established. The objective of the study was to investigate the cross-sectional association of dietary fatty acids with MCI in a population-based sample. Participants aged ≥ 70 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (participant and informant), a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. A panel of nurses, physicians, and neuropsychologists reviewed the data for each participant in order to establish a diagnosis of MCI, normal cognition, or dementia by consensus. Participants also completed a 128-item food-frequency questionnaire. Among 1,233 non-demented subjects, 163 (13.2%) had MCI. The odds ratio (OR) of MCI decreased with increasing PUFA and MUFA intake. Compared to the lowest tertile, the OR (95% confidence interval) for the upper tertiles were 0.44 (0.29-0.66; p for trend = 0.0004) for total PUFA; 0.44 (0.30-0.67; p for trend = 0.0004) for omega-6 fatty acids; 0.62 (0.42-0.91; p for trend = 0.012) for omega-3 fatty acids; and 0.56 (0.38-0.83; p for trend = 0.01) for (MUFA+PUFA):saturated fatty acid ratio after adjustment for age, sex, number of years of education, and caloric intake. In this study, higher intake of PUFA and MUFA was associated with a reduced likelihood of MCI among elderly persons in the population-based setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)853-865
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Dementia
Fatty Acids
Omega-6 Fatty Acids
Odds Ratio
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Energy Intake
Cognition
Population
Cognitive Dysfunction
Consensus
Nurses
Confidence Intervals
Physicians
Education
Food

Keywords

  • Cross-sectional studies
  • dietary fats
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • monounsaturated fatty acids
  • polyunsaturated fatty acids
  • population-based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Polyunsaturated fatty acids and reduced odds of MCI : The mayo clinic study of aging. / Roberts, Rosebud O; Cerhan, James R; Geda, Yonas Endale; Knopman, David S; Cha, Ruth H.; Christianson, Teresa J H; Pankratz, V. Shane; Ivnik, Robert J.; O'Connor, Helen M.; Petersen, Ronald Carl.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2010, p. 853-865.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, Rosebud O ; Cerhan, James R ; Geda, Yonas Endale ; Knopman, David S ; Cha, Ruth H. ; Christianson, Teresa J H ; Pankratz, V. Shane ; Ivnik, Robert J. ; O'Connor, Helen M. ; Petersen, Ronald Carl. / Polyunsaturated fatty acids and reduced odds of MCI : The mayo clinic study of aging. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2010 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 853-865.
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