Polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor and innate immunity genes influence the antibody response to rubella vaccination

Inna G. Ovsyannikova, Lana H. Haralambieva, Nestam Dhimán, Megan M. O'Byrne, V. Shane Pankratz, Robert M. Jacobson, Gregory A. Poland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. Genetic polymorphisms play an important role in rubella vaccine-induced immunity. Methods. We genotyped 714 healthy children after 2 age-appropriate doses of rubella-containing vaccine for 142 potential single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results. Specific polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I), and tripartite motif 5 and 22 (TRIM5 and TRIM22) genes were significantly associated with rubella vaccine humoral immunity. The minor allele of the rs4416353 in the vitamin A receptor gene was associated with an allele dose-related decrease (P = .019) in rubella antibody response. The minor allele of rs6793694, in the vitamin A receptor gene, was associated with an allele dose-related antibody decrease (P = .039). The minor variant of nonsynonymous SNP rsl0813831 (Arg7Cys) in the RIG-I gene was associated with an allele dose-related decrease in rubella antibody level from 37.4 to 28.0 IU/mL (P = .035), whereas increased representation of the minor allele of the 5UTR SNP (rs3824949, P = .015) in the antiretroviral TRIM5 gene was associated with an allele dose-related increase in rubella antibody. It is of particular interest that the nonsynonymous SNP rs3740996 (His43Tyr) in the TRIM5 gene was associated with variations in rubella antibody response (P = .016) after having been previously found to play a significant functional role. Conclusions. These findings further expand our immunogenetic understanding of mechanisms of rubella vaccine-induced immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-213
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume201
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2010

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Rubella
Vitamin A
Innate Immunity
Antibody Formation
Vaccination
Rubella Vaccine
Alleles
Genes
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Immunity
Immunogenetics
Retinoic Acid Receptors
Genetic Polymorphisms
Humoral Immunity
Tretinoin
rubella antibodies
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ovsyannikova, I. G., Haralambieva, L. H., Dhimán, N., O'Byrne, M. M., Pankratz, V. S., Jacobson, R. M., & Poland, G. A. (2010). Polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor and innate immunity genes influence the antibody response to rubella vaccination. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 201(2), 207-213. https://doi.org/10.1086/649588

Polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor and innate immunity genes influence the antibody response to rubella vaccination. / Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Haralambieva, Lana H.; Dhimán, Nestam; O'Byrne, Megan M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Jacobson, Robert M.; Poland, Gregory A.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 201, No. 2, 15.01.2010, p. 207-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ovsyannikova, IG, Haralambieva, LH, Dhimán, N, O'Byrne, MM, Pankratz, VS, Jacobson, RM & Poland, GA 2010, 'Polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor and innate immunity genes influence the antibody response to rubella vaccination', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 201, no. 2, pp. 207-213. https://doi.org/10.1086/649588
Ovsyannikova IG, Haralambieva LH, Dhimán N, O'Byrne MM, Pankratz VS, Jacobson RM et al. Polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor and innate immunity genes influence the antibody response to rubella vaccination. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010 Jan 15;201(2):207-213. https://doi.org/10.1086/649588
Ovsyannikova, Inna G. ; Haralambieva, Lana H. ; Dhimán, Nestam ; O'Byrne, Megan M. ; Pankratz, V. Shane ; Jacobson, Robert M. ; Poland, Gregory A. / Polymorphisms in the vitamin A receptor and innate immunity genes influence the antibody response to rubella vaccination. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 201, No. 2. pp. 207-213.
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