Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic

Bharath Wootla, Aleksandar Denic, Moses Rodriguez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages79-110
Number of pages32
Volume1060
ISBN (Print)9781627035859
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1060
ISSN (Print)10643745

Fingerprint

Monoclonal Antibodies
Antibodies
Glycosylation
Immune System
Clone Cells
Organic Chemicals
Complement Activation
Agglutination
Virus Diseases
Antibody Formation
Immunoglobulins
Blood Proteins
B-Lymphocytes
Amino Acids

Keywords

  • Antibody
  • Disorders
  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Polyclonal antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Wootla, B., Denic, A., & Rodriguez, M. (2014). Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. In Methods in Molecular Biology (Vol. 1060, pp. 79-110). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1060). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-586-6_5

Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. / Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1060 Humana Press Inc., 2014. p. 79-110 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1060).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wootla, B, Denic, A & Rodriguez, M 2014, Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. in Methods in Molecular Biology. vol. 1060, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1060, Humana Press Inc., pp. 79-110. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-586-6_5
Wootla B, Denic A, Rodriguez M. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1060. Humana Press Inc. 2014. p. 79-110. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-586-6_5
Wootla, Bharath ; Denic, Aleksandar ; Rodriguez, Moses. / Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1060 Humana Press Inc., 2014. pp. 79-110 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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