Physiologic Imaging of the Spine

Jad G. Khalil, Ahmad Nassr, Timothy Maus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spine imaging poses unique challenges to radiologist and clinician. The dynamic nature of the spine and its mobility across multiple segments is difficult to depict with any single imaging modality. Supine imaging fails to demonstrate the physiologic effects seen with axial load, physiologic posture or positional change. Physiologic imaging begins with standing radiographs. Advanced techniques include axial loading devices on conventional CT or MRI, dynamic (upright) MRI and stereoradiography (EOS). These techniques may unmask dynamic pathology that otherwise would be hidden on conventional supine imaging. Caution must be exercised where such techniques (upright MRI) reduce sensitivity to sinister disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-611
Number of pages13
JournalRadiologic Clinics of North America
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Spine
Weight-Bearing
Posture
Pathology
Equipment and Supplies
Radiologists

Keywords

  • Dynamic imaging
  • EOS
  • Lumbar stenosis
  • Physiologic imaging
  • Radiculopathy
  • Spine
  • Upright MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Physiologic Imaging of the Spine. / Khalil, Jad G.; Nassr, Ahmad; Maus, Timothy.

In: Radiologic Clinics of North America, Vol. 50, No. 4, 01.07.2012, p. 599-611.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Khalil, Jad G. ; Nassr, Ahmad ; Maus, Timothy. / Physiologic Imaging of the Spine. In: Radiologic Clinics of North America. 2012 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 599-611.
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