Physician staffing models impact the timing of decisions to limit life support in the ICU

Michael Wilson, Ramez Samirat, Murat Yilmaz, Ognjen Gajic, Vivek N. Iyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A growing trend is the implementation of 24-h attending physician coverage in the ICU. Our aim was to measure the impact of 24-h, in-house, attending intensivist coverage on the quality of end-of-life care and the timing of end-of-life decision-making. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all ICU deaths 6 months before and 6 months after the implementation of mandatory 24-h attending intensivist coverage in a medical ICU. Data relevant to end-of-life care per established consensus recommendations were abstracted from the medical record. Results: The following changes were observed after implementation of 24-h intensivist coverage: Time from ICU admission to decision to withdraw mechanical ventilation and time to decision to change to do-not-resuscitate code status both were shortened by 2 days (both P = .03). Quality measures, such as increased family presence around time of death (P = .01) also improved. Other findings, which did not reach statistical significance, included the following: Time to family conference was shortened by 2 days (P = .09), time to decision to limit any life support was shortened by 1 day (P = .08), time to death was shortened by 2 days (P = .08), and intubations against patient wishes decreased (from three to none; P = .12). Conclusions: The implementation of mandatory 24-h, in-house, attending intensivist coverage was associated with earlier decision-making across a number of domains related to end-of-life care. Positive trends were noted in quality of end-of-life care as reflected in the presence of family at the time of death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)656-663
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume143
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Terminal Care
Physicians
Decision Making
Quality of Life
Artificial Respiration
Intubation
Medical Records
Consensus
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Physician staffing models impact the timing of decisions to limit life support in the ICU. / Wilson, Michael; Samirat, Ramez; Yilmaz, Murat; Gajic, Ognjen; Iyer, Vivek N.

In: Chest, Vol. 143, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 656-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, Michael ; Samirat, Ramez ; Yilmaz, Murat ; Gajic, Ognjen ; Iyer, Vivek N. / Physician staffing models impact the timing of decisions to limit life support in the ICU. In: Chest. 2013 ; Vol. 143, No. 3. pp. 656-663.
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