Physical activity in relation to cancer of the colon and rectum in a cohort of male smokers

Lisa H. Colbert, Terryl J. Hartman, Nea Malila, Paul John Limburg, Pirjo Pietinen, Jarmo Virtamo, Philip R. Taylor, Demetrius Albanes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We examined the association between occupational and leisure physical activity and colorectal cancer in a cohort of male smokers. Among the 29,133 men aged 50-69 years in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention study, 152 colon and 104 rectal cancers were documented during up to 12 years of follow-up. For colon cancer, compared with sedentary workers, men in light occupational activity had a relative risk (RR) of 0.60 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-1.04], whereas those in moderate/heavy activity had an RR of 0.45 (CI, 0.26-0.78; P for trend, 0.003). Subsite analysis revealed a significant association for moderate/heavy occupational activity in the distal colon (RR, 0.21; CI, 0.09-0.51) but not in the proximal colon (RR, 0.87; CI, 0.40-1.92). There was no significant association between leisure activity and colon cancer (active versus sedentary; RR, 0.82; CI, 0.59-1.13); however, the strongest inverse association was found among those most active in both work and leisure (RR, 0.33; CI, 0.16-0.71). For rectal cancer, there were risk reductions for those in light (RR, 0.71; CI, 0.36-1.37) and moderate/heavy occupational activity (RR, 0.50; CI, 0.26-0.97; P for trend, 0.04), and no association for leisure activity. These data provide evidence for a protective role of physical activity in colon and rectal cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-268
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001

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Rectal Neoplasms
Colonic Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Leisure Activities
Colon
Light
beta Carotene
alpha-Tocopherol
Risk Reduction Behavior
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Colbert, L. H., Hartman, T. J., Malila, N., Limburg, P. J., Pietinen, P., Virtamo, J., ... Albanes, D. (2001). Physical activity in relation to cancer of the colon and rectum in a cohort of male smokers. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 10(3), 265-268.

Physical activity in relation to cancer of the colon and rectum in a cohort of male smokers. / Colbert, Lisa H.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Malila, Nea; Limburg, Paul John; Pietinen, Pirjo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R.; Albanes, Demetrius.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 10, No. 3, 2001, p. 265-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colbert, LH, Hartman, TJ, Malila, N, Limburg, PJ, Pietinen, P, Virtamo, J, Taylor, PR & Albanes, D 2001, 'Physical activity in relation to cancer of the colon and rectum in a cohort of male smokers', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 265-268.
Colbert, Lisa H. ; Hartman, Terryl J. ; Malila, Nea ; Limburg, Paul John ; Pietinen, Pirjo ; Virtamo, Jarmo ; Taylor, Philip R. ; Albanes, Demetrius. / Physical activity in relation to cancer of the colon and rectum in a cohort of male smokers. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2001 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 265-268.
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