Photomechanical transcutaneous delivery of macromolecules

Shun Lee, Daniel J. McAuliffe, Thomas J Flotte, Nikiforos Kollias, Apostolos G. Doukas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transcutaneous drug delivery has been the subject of intensive research. In certain situations, rapid transcutaneous delivery is very desirable. A mechanical (stress) pulse generated by a single laser pulse was shown to transiently increase the permeability of the stratum corneum in vivo. The barrier function of the stratum corneum recovers within minutes. The increased permeability during these few minutes allows macromolecules to diffuse through the stratum corneum into the viable epidermis and dermis. Macromolecules (40 kDa dextran and 20 nm latex particles) were deposited into the skin using a photomechanical pulse generated by a single 23 ns laser pulse. This treatment can potentially be utilized in therapies that currently require occlusive dressings for hours or day(s).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-929
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume111
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Macromolecules
Cornea
Laser pulses
Permeability
Lasers
Occlusive Dressings
Mechanical Stress
Dermis
Dextrans
Microspheres
Epidermis
Latex
Drug delivery
Skin
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Photoacoustics
  • Shock waves
  • Stress waves
  • Transdermal drug delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Photomechanical transcutaneous delivery of macromolecules. / Lee, Shun; McAuliffe, Daniel J.; Flotte, Thomas J; Kollias, Nikiforos; Doukas, Apostolos G.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol. 111, No. 6, 1998, p. 925-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Shun ; McAuliffe, Daniel J. ; Flotte, Thomas J ; Kollias, Nikiforos ; Doukas, Apostolos G. / Photomechanical transcutaneous delivery of macromolecules. In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 1998 ; Vol. 111, No. 6. pp. 925-929.
@article{26273e0211ab476ca467a275e122079c,
title = "Photomechanical transcutaneous delivery of macromolecules",
abstract = "Transcutaneous drug delivery has been the subject of intensive research. In certain situations, rapid transcutaneous delivery is very desirable. A mechanical (stress) pulse generated by a single laser pulse was shown to transiently increase the permeability of the stratum corneum in vivo. The barrier function of the stratum corneum recovers within minutes. The increased permeability during these few minutes allows macromolecules to diffuse through the stratum corneum into the viable epidermis and dermis. Macromolecules (40 kDa dextran and 20 nm latex particles) were deposited into the skin using a photomechanical pulse generated by a single 23 ns laser pulse. This treatment can potentially be utilized in therapies that currently require occlusive dressings for hours or day(s).",
keywords = "Photoacoustics, Shock waves, Stress waves, Transdermal drug delivery",
author = "Shun Lee and McAuliffe, {Daniel J.} and Flotte, {Thomas J} and Nikiforos Kollias and Doukas, {Apostolos G.}",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1046/j.1523-1747.1998.00415.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "111",
pages = "925--929",
journal = "Journal of Investigative Dermatology",
issn = "0022-202X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Photomechanical transcutaneous delivery of macromolecules

AU - Lee, Shun

AU - McAuliffe, Daniel J.

AU - Flotte, Thomas J

AU - Kollias, Nikiforos

AU - Doukas, Apostolos G.

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Transcutaneous drug delivery has been the subject of intensive research. In certain situations, rapid transcutaneous delivery is very desirable. A mechanical (stress) pulse generated by a single laser pulse was shown to transiently increase the permeability of the stratum corneum in vivo. The barrier function of the stratum corneum recovers within minutes. The increased permeability during these few minutes allows macromolecules to diffuse through the stratum corneum into the viable epidermis and dermis. Macromolecules (40 kDa dextran and 20 nm latex particles) were deposited into the skin using a photomechanical pulse generated by a single 23 ns laser pulse. This treatment can potentially be utilized in therapies that currently require occlusive dressings for hours or day(s).

AB - Transcutaneous drug delivery has been the subject of intensive research. In certain situations, rapid transcutaneous delivery is very desirable. A mechanical (stress) pulse generated by a single laser pulse was shown to transiently increase the permeability of the stratum corneum in vivo. The barrier function of the stratum corneum recovers within minutes. The increased permeability during these few minutes allows macromolecules to diffuse through the stratum corneum into the viable epidermis and dermis. Macromolecules (40 kDa dextran and 20 nm latex particles) were deposited into the skin using a photomechanical pulse generated by a single 23 ns laser pulse. This treatment can potentially be utilized in therapies that currently require occlusive dressings for hours or day(s).

KW - Photoacoustics

KW - Shock waves

KW - Stress waves

KW - Transdermal drug delivery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032457473&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032457473&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1046/j.1523-1747.1998.00415.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1523-1747.1998.00415.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 9856797

AN - SCOPUS:0032457473

VL - 111

SP - 925

EP - 929

JO - Journal of Investigative Dermatology

JF - Journal of Investigative Dermatology

SN - 0022-202X

IS - 6

ER -