Phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization synergistically enhance oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogel osteoconductivity for bone tissue engineering

Matthew N. George, Xifeng Liu, Alan Lee Miller, Haocheng Xu, Lichun Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A current approach in bone tissue engineering is the implantation of polymeric scaffolds that promote osteoblast attachment and growth as well as biomineralization. One promising polymer is oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF), a polyethylene glycol-based material that is biocompatible, injectable, and biodegradable, but in its native form does not support robust bone cell attachment or growth. To address this issue, this study evaluated the osteoconductivity of bis[02-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP) functionalized OPF hydrogels (OPF-BP) using MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells, both before and after enzymatic mineralization with a calcium solution. The inclusion of negatively charged functional groups allowed for the tailored uptake and release of calcium, while also altering the mechanical properties and surface topography of the hydrogel surface. In cell culture, OPF-BP hydrogels with 20 and 30% (w/w) BP optimized osteoblast attachment, proliferation, and differentiation after a 21-day in vitro period. In addition, the OPF-BP30 treatment, when mineralized with calcium, exhibited a 128% increase in osteocalcin expression when compared with the non-mineralized treatment. These findings suggest that phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization can act synergistically to enhance the osteoconductivity of OPF hydrogels, making this processed material an attractive candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hydrogel
Tissue engineering
Hydrogels
Polyethylene glycols
Calcium
Osteoblasts
Bone
Phosphates
Biomineralization
Osteocalcin
Surface topography
Scaffolds (biology)
Cell culture
Functional groups
Polymers
Mechanical properties
oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate)

Keywords

  • bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP)
  • bone tissue engineering
  • osteoblast
  • osteoconduction
  • phosphate functional groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

@article{85a14e8513ed4c1ead5a8856199c43d8,
title = "Phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization synergistically enhance oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogel osteoconductivity for bone tissue engineering",
abstract = "A current approach in bone tissue engineering is the implantation of polymeric scaffolds that promote osteoblast attachment and growth as well as biomineralization. One promising polymer is oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF), a polyethylene glycol-based material that is biocompatible, injectable, and biodegradable, but in its native form does not support robust bone cell attachment or growth. To address this issue, this study evaluated the osteoconductivity of bis[02-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP) functionalized OPF hydrogels (OPF-BP) using MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells, both before and after enzymatic mineralization with a calcium solution. The inclusion of negatively charged functional groups allowed for the tailored uptake and release of calcium, while also altering the mechanical properties and surface topography of the hydrogel surface. In cell culture, OPF-BP hydrogels with 20 and 30{\%} (w/w) BP optimized osteoblast attachment, proliferation, and differentiation after a 21-day in vitro period. In addition, the OPF-BP30 treatment, when mineralized with calcium, exhibited a 128{\%} increase in osteocalcin expression when compared with the non-mineralized treatment. These findings suggest that phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization can act synergistically to enhance the osteoconductivity of OPF hydrogels, making this processed material an attractive candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.",
keywords = "bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP), bone tissue engineering, osteoblast, osteoconduction, phosphate functional groups",
author = "George, {Matthew N.} and Xifeng Liu and Miller, {Alan Lee} and Haocheng Xu and Lichun Lu",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jbm.a.36832",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A",
issn = "1549-3296",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization synergistically enhance oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogel osteoconductivity for bone tissue engineering

AU - George, Matthew N.

AU - Liu, Xifeng

AU - Miller, Alan Lee

AU - Xu, Haocheng

AU - Lu, Lichun

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - A current approach in bone tissue engineering is the implantation of polymeric scaffolds that promote osteoblast attachment and growth as well as biomineralization. One promising polymer is oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF), a polyethylene glycol-based material that is biocompatible, injectable, and biodegradable, but in its native form does not support robust bone cell attachment or growth. To address this issue, this study evaluated the osteoconductivity of bis[02-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP) functionalized OPF hydrogels (OPF-BP) using MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells, both before and after enzymatic mineralization with a calcium solution. The inclusion of negatively charged functional groups allowed for the tailored uptake and release of calcium, while also altering the mechanical properties and surface topography of the hydrogel surface. In cell culture, OPF-BP hydrogels with 20 and 30% (w/w) BP optimized osteoblast attachment, proliferation, and differentiation after a 21-day in vitro period. In addition, the OPF-BP30 treatment, when mineralized with calcium, exhibited a 128% increase in osteocalcin expression when compared with the non-mineralized treatment. These findings suggest that phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization can act synergistically to enhance the osteoconductivity of OPF hydrogels, making this processed material an attractive candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

AB - A current approach in bone tissue engineering is the implantation of polymeric scaffolds that promote osteoblast attachment and growth as well as biomineralization. One promising polymer is oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF), a polyethylene glycol-based material that is biocompatible, injectable, and biodegradable, but in its native form does not support robust bone cell attachment or growth. To address this issue, this study evaluated the osteoconductivity of bis[02-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP) functionalized OPF hydrogels (OPF-BP) using MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells, both before and after enzymatic mineralization with a calcium solution. The inclusion of negatively charged functional groups allowed for the tailored uptake and release of calcium, while also altering the mechanical properties and surface topography of the hydrogel surface. In cell culture, OPF-BP hydrogels with 20 and 30% (w/w) BP optimized osteoblast attachment, proliferation, and differentiation after a 21-day in vitro period. In addition, the OPF-BP30 treatment, when mineralized with calcium, exhibited a 128% increase in osteocalcin expression when compared with the non-mineralized treatment. These findings suggest that phosphate functionalization and enzymatic calcium mineralization can act synergistically to enhance the osteoconductivity of OPF hydrogels, making this processed material an attractive candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

KW - bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (BP)

KW - bone tissue engineering

KW - osteoblast

KW - osteoconduction

KW - phosphate functional groups

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075742726&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85075742726&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jbm.a.36832

DO - 10.1002/jbm.a.36832

M3 - Article

C2 - 31702863

AN - SCOPUS:85075742726

JO - Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A

JF - Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A

SN - 1549-3296

ER -