Personalized Video Feedback and Repeated Task Practice Improve Laparoscopic Knot-Tying Skills: Two Controlled Trials

Eduardo F. Abbott, Whitney Thompson, T. K. Pandian, Benjamin Zendejas, David R. Farley, David Allan Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Compare the effect of personalized feedback (PF) vs. task demonstration (TD), both delivered via video, on laparoscopic knot-tying skills and perceived workload; and evaluate the effect of repeated practice.

METHOD: General surgery interns and research fellows completed four repetitions of a simulated laparoscopic knot-tying task at one-month intervals. Midway between repetitions, participants received via e-mail either a TD video (demonstration by an expert) or a PF video (video of their own performance with voiceover from a blinded senior surgeon). Each participant received at least one video per format, with sequence randomly assigned. Outcomes included performance scores and NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) scores. To evaluate the effectiveness of repeated practice, scores from these trainees on a separate delayed retention test were compared against historical controls who did not have scheduled repetitions.

RESULTS: Twenty-one trainees completed the randomized study. Mean change in performance scores was significantly greater for those receiving PF (difference = 23.1 of 150 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0, 46.2], P = .05). Perceived workload was also significantly reduced (difference = -3.0 of 20 [95% CI: -5.8, -0.3], P = .04). Compared with historical controls (N = 93), the 21 with scheduled repeated practice had higher scores on the laparoscopic knot-tying assessment two weeks after the final repetition (difference = 1.5 of 10 [95% CI: 0.2, 2.8], P = .02).

CONCLUSIONS: Personalized video feedback improves trainees' procedural performance and perceived workload compared with a task demonstration video. Brief monthly practice sessions support skill acquisition and retention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S26-S32
JournalAcademic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Volume92
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Personalized Video Feedback and Repeated Task Practice Improve Laparoscopic Knot-Tying Skills : Two Controlled Trials. / Abbott, Eduardo F.; Thompson, Whitney; Pandian, T. K.; Zendejas, Benjamin; Farley, David R.; Cook, David Allan.

In: Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, Vol. 92, No. 11, 01.11.2017, p. S26-S32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abbott, Eduardo F. ; Thompson, Whitney ; Pandian, T. K. ; Zendejas, Benjamin ; Farley, David R. ; Cook, David Allan. / Personalized Video Feedback and Repeated Task Practice Improve Laparoscopic Knot-Tying Skills : Two Controlled Trials. In: Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges. 2017 ; Vol. 92, No. 11. pp. S26-S32.
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