Peripheral sensory abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis

J. M. Shefner, J. L. Carter, C. Krarup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although multiple sclerosis primarily affects myelin within the central nervous system, both pathologic and physiological studies suggest that mild deficits in peripheral nervous system myelin may be common. To evaluate this question further, we performed near nerve studies on sural nerves of 14 patients with multiple sclerosis. Peak-to-peak amplitude and maximum conduction velocity were normal in 9 of 14 patients, while minimum conduction velocity, or the velocity of the slowest-conducting component of the sensory action potential, was abnormally reduced in 9 patients. In addition, the supernormal period was evaluated for patients and compared with a control sample; multiple sclerosis patients showed a significant reduction in the amplitude of supernormality. Both the reduction in minimum conduction velocity and the alteration in the supernormal period are consistent with a mild defect in peripheral myelin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-76
Number of pages4
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Myelin Sheath
Sural Nerve
Peripheral Nervous System
Action Potentials
Central Nervous System

Keywords

  • multiple sclerosis
  • neuropathy
  • sensory action potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Shefner, J. M., Carter, J. L., & Krarup, C. (1992). Peripheral sensory abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis. Muscle and Nerve, 15(1), 73-76.

Peripheral sensory abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis. / Shefner, J. M.; Carter, J. L.; Krarup, C.

In: Muscle and Nerve, Vol. 15, No. 1, 1992, p. 73-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shefner, JM, Carter, JL & Krarup, C 1992, 'Peripheral sensory abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis', Muscle and Nerve, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 73-76.
Shefner, J. M. ; Carter, J. L. ; Krarup, C. / Peripheral sensory abnormalities in patients with multiple sclerosis. In: Muscle and Nerve. 1992 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 73-76.
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