Peripheral Nerve Blockade with Combined Standard and Liposomal Bupivacaine in Major Lower-Extremity Amputation

Catalina I. Dumitrascu, Nafisseh S. Warner, Thomas M. Stewart, Adam W. Amundson, Danette L. Bruns, Andrew C. Hanson, Phillip J. Schulte, Mark M. Smith, Michael J. Brown, Adam D. Niesen, Carlos B. Mantilla, Matthew A. Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Optimizing perioperative analgesia for patients undergoing major lower-extremity amputation remains a considerable challenge. The utility of liposomal bupivacaine as a component of peripheral nerve blockade for lower-extremity amputation is unknown. Methods: We conducted an observational study comparing three different perioperative analgesic techniques for adults undergoing major lower-extremity amputation under general anesthesia between 2012 and 2017 at an academic medical center: (1) no regional anesthesia, (2) peripheral nerve blockade with standard bupivacaine, and (3) peripheral nerve blockade with a mixture of standard and liposomal bupivacaine. The primary outcome of cumulative opioid oral morphine milligram equivalent utilization in the first 72 hours postoperatively was compared across groups utilizing multivariable linear regression. Results: A total of 631 unique anesthetics were included for 578 unique patients, including 416 (66%) without regional anesthesia, 131 (21%) with peripheral nerve blockade with a mixture of standard and liposomal bupivacaine, and 84 (13%) with peripheral nerve blockade with standard bupivacaine alone. Cumulative morphine equivalents were lower in those receiving peripheral nerve blockade with combined standard and liposomal bupivacaine compared with those not receiving regional anesthesia (multiplicative increase 0.67; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.90; P = 0.007). There were no significant differences in opioid utilization between peripheral nerve blockade groups (P = 0.59). Conclusions: Peripheral nerve blockade is associated with reduced opioid requirements after lower-extremity amputation compared with general anesthesia alone. However, the incorporation of liposomal bupivacaine is not significantly different to blockade employing only standard bupivacaine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPain Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • acute pain service
  • anesthesia
  • opioid analgesics
  • peripheral nervous system
  • regional

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Peripheral Nerve Blockade with Combined Standard and Liposomal Bupivacaine in Major Lower-Extremity Amputation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this