Perfusion and diffusion measurements in vivo with insensitivity to motion artifact

Thomas L. Chenevert, James G. Pipe, James A. Brunberg

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A technique that offers sensitivity to perfusion and diffusion while being resistant to bulk tissue motion artifacts that complicate such measurements is demonstrated. The impact of bulk motion artifact is addressed via computer simulation of phase errors propagated to perfusion and diffusion estimates when conventional phase-encoded MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) acquisition is employed. Results of localized measurement bulk motion induced phase instability are shown to be substantial even for cardiac gated human brain imaging. Motion artifact is remedied via orthogonal slice-selection and spatial frequency encoding in conjunction with phase insensitive signal averaging. Examples of perfusion and diffusion values measured in the human brain by this method are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomedical Engineering Perspectives
Subtitle of host publicationHealth Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages73-74
Number of pages2
Editionpt 1
ISBN (Print)0879425598
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990
EventProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Philadelphia, PA, USA
Duration: Nov 1 1990Nov 4 1990

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology
Numberpt 1
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityPhiladelphia, PA, USA
Period11/1/9011/4/90

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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  • Cite this

    Chenevert, T. L., Pipe, J. G., & Brunberg, J. A. (1990). Perfusion and diffusion measurements in vivo with insensitivity to motion artifact. In Biomedical Engineering Perspectives: Health Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond (pt 1 ed., pp. 73-74). (Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology; No. pt 1). Publ by IEEE.