Percutaneous vertebroplasty for painful compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with a decreased expectation-related placebo effect due to dementia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although abundant literature has reported success with vertebroplasty for the treatment of painful compression fractures, none has accounted for a potential expectation-related placebo effect. We report the results of vertebroplasty for painful vertebral body compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with dementia with the assumption that this patient subgroup is subjected to a decreased placebo effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with objective evidence of dementia (N = 10) who had undergone vertebroplasty at our institution were identified from a comprehensive prospectively constructed vertebroplasty data base. The patients' pain at rest and activity, mobility, and painmedication use were analyzed at 2 hours postprocedure, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year. RESULTS: Pain with activity decreased or resolved in 80%-100% of patients at each time point, whereas pain at rest decreased or resolved in 78%-100% of all patients at each time point. Improved mobility was reported in 80%-100% of patients at all time points. Pain medication was decreased or stopped in 67% of patients at 1 week and in 100% of patients at 6 months and 1 year. CONCLUSION: Treatment of painful compression fractures in patients with dementia demonstrates a high rate of success regarding pain relief and mobility. This study offers additional evidence that vertebroplasty has true benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1461-1464
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Vertebroplasty
Compression Fractures
Placebo Effect
Dementia
Pain
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

@article{363656ef6ac44710ab45d1cd98c72ce7,
title = "Percutaneous vertebroplasty for painful compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with a decreased expectation-related placebo effect due to dementia",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although abundant literature has reported success with vertebroplasty for the treatment of painful compression fractures, none has accounted for a potential expectation-related placebo effect. We report the results of vertebroplasty for painful vertebral body compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with dementia with the assumption that this patient subgroup is subjected to a decreased placebo effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with objective evidence of dementia (N = 10) who had undergone vertebroplasty at our institution were identified from a comprehensive prospectively constructed vertebroplasty data base. The patients' pain at rest and activity, mobility, and painmedication use were analyzed at 2 hours postprocedure, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year. RESULTS: Pain with activity decreased or resolved in 80{\%}-100{\%} of patients at each time point, whereas pain at rest decreased or resolved in 78{\%}-100{\%} of all patients at each time point. Improved mobility was reported in 80{\%}-100{\%} of patients at all time points. Pain medication was decreased or stopped in 67{\%} of patients at 1 week and in 100{\%} of patients at 6 months and 1 year. CONCLUSION: Treatment of painful compression fractures in patients with dementia demonstrates a high rate of success regarding pain relief and mobility. This study offers additional evidence that vertebroplasty has true benefit.",
author = "Lehman, {Vance T} and Gray, {L. A.} and Kallmes, {David F}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
doi = "10.3174/ajnr.A1173",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "1461--1464",
journal = "American Journal of Neuroradiology",
issn = "0195-6108",
publisher = "American Society of Neuroradiology",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Percutaneous vertebroplasty for painful compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with a decreased expectation-related placebo effect due to dementia

AU - Lehman, Vance T

AU - Gray, L. A.

AU - Kallmes, David F

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although abundant literature has reported success with vertebroplasty for the treatment of painful compression fractures, none has accounted for a potential expectation-related placebo effect. We report the results of vertebroplasty for painful vertebral body compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with dementia with the assumption that this patient subgroup is subjected to a decreased placebo effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with objective evidence of dementia (N = 10) who had undergone vertebroplasty at our institution were identified from a comprehensive prospectively constructed vertebroplasty data base. The patients' pain at rest and activity, mobility, and painmedication use were analyzed at 2 hours postprocedure, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year. RESULTS: Pain with activity decreased or resolved in 80%-100% of patients at each time point, whereas pain at rest decreased or resolved in 78%-100% of all patients at each time point. Improved mobility was reported in 80%-100% of patients at all time points. Pain medication was decreased or stopped in 67% of patients at 1 week and in 100% of patients at 6 months and 1 year. CONCLUSION: Treatment of painful compression fractures in patients with dementia demonstrates a high rate of success regarding pain relief and mobility. This study offers additional evidence that vertebroplasty has true benefit.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although abundant literature has reported success with vertebroplasty for the treatment of painful compression fractures, none has accounted for a potential expectation-related placebo effect. We report the results of vertebroplasty for painful vertebral body compression fractures in a small cohort of patients with dementia with the assumption that this patient subgroup is subjected to a decreased placebo effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with objective evidence of dementia (N = 10) who had undergone vertebroplasty at our institution were identified from a comprehensive prospectively constructed vertebroplasty data base. The patients' pain at rest and activity, mobility, and painmedication use were analyzed at 2 hours postprocedure, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year. RESULTS: Pain with activity decreased or resolved in 80%-100% of patients at each time point, whereas pain at rest decreased or resolved in 78%-100% of all patients at each time point. Improved mobility was reported in 80%-100% of patients at all time points. Pain medication was decreased or stopped in 67% of patients at 1 week and in 100% of patients at 6 months and 1 year. CONCLUSION: Treatment of painful compression fractures in patients with dementia demonstrates a high rate of success regarding pain relief and mobility. This study offers additional evidence that vertebroplasty has true benefit.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=51649090676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=51649090676&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3174/ajnr.A1173

DO - 10.3174/ajnr.A1173

M3 - Article

C2 - 18556355

AN - SCOPUS:51649090676

VL - 29

SP - 1461

EP - 1464

JO - American Journal of Neuroradiology

JF - American Journal of Neuroradiology

SN - 0195-6108

IS - 8

ER -