Percutaneous biopsy of musculoskeletal tumors and the potential for needle tract seeding: technical considerations, current controversies, and outcomes

Cara Lai, Jeremiah R. Long, Brandon T. Larsen, Jose M. Iturregui, Benjamin K. Wilke, Krista A. Goulding

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Multidisciplinary communication and planning between the musculoskeletal radiologist and orthopedic oncologist are essential for proper biopsy planning when a primary musculoskeletal malignancy is suspected. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy allows for real-time visualization of the biopsy needle and surrounding structures, combining high diagnostic accuracy with safety and cost-effectiveness. However, determining a surgically optimal biopsy trajectory for a mass can be technically challenging due to critical surrounding anatomy or challenging needle approach angles. Inappropriately placed biopsies can have serious repercussions on patient function and oncological survival. The potential for needle tract seeding and local recurrence after biopsy of sarcoma has been central to the debate regarding the need for excision of the biopsy tract. This multidisciplinary review highlights current controversies in the field, including the issue of core needle biopsy tracts and their excision, technical considerations and advances in image-guidance in the setting of challenging biopsies, advances in histopathological diagnostics with implications for targeted therapy in sarcoma, as well as surgical and oncological outcomes after needle tract biopsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSkeletal Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Bone tumors
  • Musculoskeletal oncology
  • Needle tract seeding
  • Percutaneous biopsy
  • Sarcoma
  • Soft tissue tumors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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