Perceptions of prostate cancer fatalism and screening behavior between United States-born and Caribbean-born Black males

Ewan K. Cobran, Anthony K. Wutoh, Euni Lee, Folakemi T. Odedina, Camille Ragin, William Aiken, Paul A. Godley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cancer fatalism is believed to be a major barrier for cancer screening in Black males. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare perceptions of prostate cancer (CaP) fatalism and predictors of CaP screening with Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) testing between U.S.-born and Caribbean-born Black males. The Powe Fatalism Inventory and the Personal Integrative Model of CaP Disparity Survey were used to collect the following data from males in South Florida. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to examine the statistically significant predictors of CaP screening. A total of 211 U.S.-born and Caribbean-born Black males between ages 39-75 were recruited. Nativity was not a significant predictor of CaP screening with PSA testing within the last year (Odds ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.26, 2.48, p = 0.70). Overall, higher levels of CaP fatalism were not a significant predictor of CaP screening with PSA testing within the last year (OR = 1.37, 95 % CI = 0.48, 3.91, p = 0.56). The study results suggest that nativity did not influence CaP screening with PSA testing. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the association between CaP screening behavior and levels of CaP fatalism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-400
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • CaP
  • Fatalism
  • Nativity
  • Perception
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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