Patterns of Early-Life Social and Environmental Exposures and Child Cognitive Development, Rhea Birth Cohort, Crete, Greece

Mariza Kampouri, Andriani Kyriklaki, Theano Roumeliotaki, Katerina Koutra, Despoina Anousaki, Katerina Sarri, Maria Vassilaki, Manolis Kogevinas, Leda Chatzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Early-life exposures are critical for later child cognitive development. McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities (MSCA) were used to assess cognitive development of 700 preschoolers (Mage = 4.2 years), derived from the “Rhea” birth cohort, in Greece. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied on prospectively collected exposure data. Six components were extracted; five of them were associated with child cognition. Higher parental social status, preschool attendance and less TV watching, nonsmoking during pregnancy and breastfeeding, and parental involvement in child life were protective factors of child cognition at 4 years. Increased child birth order was negatively associated with child cognition. Offspring's size at birth was not associated with any cognitive outcome. These findings reveal the importance of early-life exposures to child cognitive development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1073
Number of pages11
JournalChild Development
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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    Kampouri, M., Kyriklaki, A., Roumeliotaki, T., Koutra, K., Anousaki, D., Sarri, K., Vassilaki, M., Kogevinas, M., & Chatzi, L. (2018). Patterns of Early-Life Social and Environmental Exposures and Child Cognitive Development, Rhea Birth Cohort, Crete, Greece. Child Development, 89(4), 1063-1073. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12782