Pattern of regional white matter hyperintensity volume in mild cognitive impairment subtypes and associations with decline in daily functioning

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

White matter hyperintensities (WMHs), a marker of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease, increase risk for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Less is known about whether regional WMHs distinguish MCI subtypes and predict decline in everyday functioning. About 618 Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants (301 cognitively normal [CN]; 232 amnestic MCI [aMCI]; 85 nonamnestic MCI [naMCI]) underwent neuropsychological testing, MRI, and assessment of everyday functioning. aMCI participants showed greater temporal (p = 0.002) and occipital WMHs (p = 0.030) relative to CN whereas naMCI participants had greater frontal (p = 0.045), temporal (p = 0.003), parietal (p = 0.018), and occipital (p < 0.001) WMH compared with CN. Relative to those with aMCI, individuals with naMCI showed greater occipital WMH (p = 0.013). Greater WMH in temporal (p = 0.001) and occipital regions (p = 0.006) was associated with faster decline in everyday functioning across the sample. Temporal lobe WMHs were disproportionately associated with accelerated functional decline among naMCI (p = 0.045). Regional WMH volumes vary across cognitive groups and predict functional decline. Cerebrovascular markers may help identify individuals at risk for decline and distinguish subtypes of cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurobiology of aging
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • Daily functioning
  • MCI subtypes
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuropsychology
  • White matter hyperintensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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