Pattern of changes over time in myocardial blood flow and microvascular dilator capacity in patients with normally functioning cardiac allografts

Sudhir S. Kushwaha, Jagat Narula, Navneet Narula, Gerasimos Zervos, Marc J. Semigran, Alan J. Fischman, Nathaniel A. Alpert, G. William Dec, Henry Gewirtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tests the hypothesis that myocardial blood flow and coronary microvascular dilator capacity vary as a function of time after orthotopic heart transplantation in humans. Positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow were obtained at rest and during adenosine in 24 patients between 1 and 86 months after heart transplantation. At the time of the study all patients were clinically well and had angiographically normal epicardial coronary artery vessels. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on time from transplant to positron emission tomography measurement of myocardial blood flow: group 1 to 12 months (n=9); group 13 to 34 months (n=8); and group ≥37 months (n=7). Basal myocardial blood flow in group 1 to 12 months (1.86 ± 1.01 ml/min/g) exceeded (p <0.05) that of group 13 to 34 months (1.17 ± 0.73) and group ≥37 months (0.98 ± 0.34). In group 13 to 34 months, basal myocardial blood flow and maximal dilator capacity (minimal coronary vascular resistance with adenosine 36 ± 12 mm Hg/ml/min/g) were comparable to that of normal volunteers (1.01 ± 0.20 and 37 ± 9, respectively). In group ≥37 months, maximal flow response to adenosine was reduced (2.54 ± 1.25 vs 3.16 ± 0.52, respectively, p=0.06). Maximal dilator capacity in group ≥37 months (60 ± 34) was impaired versus group 1 to 12 months (36 ± 10) and group 13 to 34 months (36 ± 12; both p<0.05) as well as normals (37 ± 9, p<0.05). During the first year after cardiac transplantation basal myocardial blood flow is elevated out of proportion to external determinants of myocardial oxygen demand, but maximal dilator capacity of the coronary microcirculation is normal. Between 1 and 3 years both basal myocardial blood flow and microvascular function tend to normalize. After 3 years, although basal myocardial blood flow is normal, microvascular dilator capacity is impaired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1377-1381
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume82
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Allografts
Heart Transplantation
Adenosine
Positron-Emission Tomography
Coronary Vessels
Time and Motion Studies
Microcirculation
Blood Group Antigens
Vascular Resistance
Healthy Volunteers
Oxygen
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Pattern of changes over time in myocardial blood flow and microvascular dilator capacity in patients with normally functioning cardiac allografts. / Kushwaha, Sudhir S.; Narula, Jagat; Narula, Navneet; Zervos, Gerasimos; Semigran, Marc J.; Fischman, Alan J.; Alpert, Nathaniel A.; Dec, G. William; Gewirtz, Henry.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 82, No. 11, 01.12.1998, p. 1377-1381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kushwaha, SS, Narula, J, Narula, N, Zervos, G, Semigran, MJ, Fischman, AJ, Alpert, NA, Dec, GW & Gewirtz, H 1998, 'Pattern of changes over time in myocardial blood flow and microvascular dilator capacity in patients with normally functioning cardiac allografts', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 82, no. 11, pp. 1377-1381. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9149(98)00645-6
Kushwaha, Sudhir S. ; Narula, Jagat ; Narula, Navneet ; Zervos, Gerasimos ; Semigran, Marc J. ; Fischman, Alan J. ; Alpert, Nathaniel A. ; Dec, G. William ; Gewirtz, Henry. / Pattern of changes over time in myocardial blood flow and microvascular dilator capacity in patients with normally functioning cardiac allografts. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 1998 ; Vol. 82, No. 11. pp. 1377-1381.
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AU - Semigran, Marc J.

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