Patient perceptions about laparoscopy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana

Adam Gyedu, Setri Fugar, Raymond Price, Juliane Bingener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Laparoscopy has become the gold standard for many surgical cases in the developed world. It however, remains a rarity in developing countries for several reasons, a major one being cost. This study aimed to determine the knowledge and attitude of patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana toward laparoscopic surgery and their willingness to pay for it. Methods: A crosssectional survey was conducted among patients attending specialist clinics at KATH. Results: 1070 patients participated. Mean age was 40±15years. 54% were city-dwellers. 14% had salary-paying jobs. None had undergone prior laparoscopic surgery. 3% had knowledge of laparoscopy. 95% preferred laparoscopy to open surgery mainly because of faster recovery and less post-op pain. Age > 45years (AOR=0.53,p=0.03) and higher education (AOR=2.00,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patient choice. Among those preferring laparoscopy, 78% were willing to pay more than the baseline cost of open surgery for laparoscopy. A history of previous abdominal surgery (AOR=0.67,p=0.02), having a salaried job compared with being unemployed (AOR=2.36,p<0.01) and living in the city compared with the village (AOR=1.78,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patients' willingness to pay more for laparoscopy. Conclusion: Knowledge about laparoscopy and its benefits are severely lacking among patients at KATH. Once educated about its benefits, most people prefer laparoscopy even if they needed to pay more for it even in resource-limited countries like Ghana.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number422
JournalPan African Medical Journal
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2015

Fingerprint

Ghana
Teaching Hospitals
Laparoscopy
Costs and Cost Analysis
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Developing Countries
Education
Pain

Keywords

  • Ghana
  • Laparoscopy
  • Patient perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patient perceptions about laparoscopy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana. / Gyedu, Adam; Fugar, Setri; Price, Raymond; Bingener, Juliane.

In: Pan African Medical Journal, Vol. 20, 422, 29.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gyedu, Adam ; Fugar, Setri ; Price, Raymond ; Bingener, Juliane. / Patient perceptions about laparoscopy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana. In: Pan African Medical Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 20.
@article{4e389d73b3af4d2a9eef152199800d82,
title = "Patient perceptions about laparoscopy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana",
abstract = "Introduction: Laparoscopy has become the gold standard for many surgical cases in the developed world. It however, remains a rarity in developing countries for several reasons, a major one being cost. This study aimed to determine the knowledge and attitude of patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana toward laparoscopic surgery and their willingness to pay for it. Methods: A crosssectional survey was conducted among patients attending specialist clinics at KATH. Results: 1070 patients participated. Mean age was 40±15years. 54{\%} were city-dwellers. 14{\%} had salary-paying jobs. None had undergone prior laparoscopic surgery. 3{\%} had knowledge of laparoscopy. 95{\%} preferred laparoscopy to open surgery mainly because of faster recovery and less post-op pain. Age > 45years (AOR=0.53,p=0.03) and higher education (AOR=2.00,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patient choice. Among those preferring laparoscopy, 78{\%} were willing to pay more than the baseline cost of open surgery for laparoscopy. A history of previous abdominal surgery (AOR=0.67,p=0.02), having a salaried job compared with being unemployed (AOR=2.36,p<0.01) and living in the city compared with the village (AOR=1.78,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patients' willingness to pay more for laparoscopy. Conclusion: Knowledge about laparoscopy and its benefits are severely lacking among patients at KATH. Once educated about its benefits, most people prefer laparoscopy even if they needed to pay more for it even in resource-limited countries like Ghana.",
keywords = "Ghana, Laparoscopy, Patient perception",
author = "Adam Gyedu and Setri Fugar and Raymond Price and Juliane Bingener",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "29",
doi = "10.11604/pamj.2015.20.422.6218",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
journal = "The Pan African medical journal",
issn = "1937-8688",
publisher = "Pan African Medical Journal",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient perceptions about laparoscopy at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Ghana

AU - Gyedu, Adam

AU - Fugar, Setri

AU - Price, Raymond

AU - Bingener, Juliane

PY - 2015/4/29

Y1 - 2015/4/29

N2 - Introduction: Laparoscopy has become the gold standard for many surgical cases in the developed world. It however, remains a rarity in developing countries for several reasons, a major one being cost. This study aimed to determine the knowledge and attitude of patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana toward laparoscopic surgery and their willingness to pay for it. Methods: A crosssectional survey was conducted among patients attending specialist clinics at KATH. Results: 1070 patients participated. Mean age was 40±15years. 54% were city-dwellers. 14% had salary-paying jobs. None had undergone prior laparoscopic surgery. 3% had knowledge of laparoscopy. 95% preferred laparoscopy to open surgery mainly because of faster recovery and less post-op pain. Age > 45years (AOR=0.53,p=0.03) and higher education (AOR=2.00,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patient choice. Among those preferring laparoscopy, 78% were willing to pay more than the baseline cost of open surgery for laparoscopy. A history of previous abdominal surgery (AOR=0.67,p=0.02), having a salaried job compared with being unemployed (AOR=2.36,p<0.01) and living in the city compared with the village (AOR=1.78,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patients' willingness to pay more for laparoscopy. Conclusion: Knowledge about laparoscopy and its benefits are severely lacking among patients at KATH. Once educated about its benefits, most people prefer laparoscopy even if they needed to pay more for it even in resource-limited countries like Ghana.

AB - Introduction: Laparoscopy has become the gold standard for many surgical cases in the developed world. It however, remains a rarity in developing countries for several reasons, a major one being cost. This study aimed to determine the knowledge and attitude of patients attending Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana toward laparoscopic surgery and their willingness to pay for it. Methods: A crosssectional survey was conducted among patients attending specialist clinics at KATH. Results: 1070 patients participated. Mean age was 40±15years. 54% were city-dwellers. 14% had salary-paying jobs. None had undergone prior laparoscopic surgery. 3% had knowledge of laparoscopy. 95% preferred laparoscopy to open surgery mainly because of faster recovery and less post-op pain. Age > 45years (AOR=0.53,p=0.03) and higher education (AOR=2.00,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patient choice. Among those preferring laparoscopy, 78% were willing to pay more than the baseline cost of open surgery for laparoscopy. A history of previous abdominal surgery (AOR=0.67,p=0.02), having a salaried job compared with being unemployed (AOR=2.36,p<0.01) and living in the city compared with the village (AOR=1.78,p=0.04) were significant predictors of patients' willingness to pay more for laparoscopy. Conclusion: Knowledge about laparoscopy and its benefits are severely lacking among patients at KATH. Once educated about its benefits, most people prefer laparoscopy even if they needed to pay more for it even in resource-limited countries like Ghana.

KW - Ghana

KW - Laparoscopy

KW - Patient perception

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940189172&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940189172&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.11604/pamj.2015.20.422.6218

DO - 10.11604/pamj.2015.20.422.6218

M3 - Article

C2 - 26309455

AN - SCOPUS:84940189172

VL - 20

JO - The Pan African medical journal

JF - The Pan African medical journal

SN - 1937-8688

M1 - 422

ER -