Patient-oriented education and visual-aid intervention are inadequate to identify patients with potential capsule retention: a prospective randomized study

Badr Al-Bawardy, Amrit K. Kamboj, Shiv Desai, Emmanuel Gorospe, David H Bruining, Christopher J. Gostout, Stephanie L. Hansel, Mark V. Larson, Joseph A Murray, Vandana Nehra, Cadman Leggett, Lawrence Szarka, Robert E. Watson, Elizabeth Rajan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/aims: The key procedure-related risk with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is capsule retention, which should be suspected in patients who have not reported capsule passage. The study aims were to determine the frequency of capsule passage visualization and the difference in self-reporting of capsule passage between patients who receive patient-oriented education (POE) and patients who receive POE and a visual aid intervention in the form of a wrist band (WB). Methods: This was a prospective randomized study that enrolled patients undergoing VCE. Patients were randomly assigned to a POE group versus a POE and WB group. POE consisted of verbal education and an information booklet. Both groups received instructions to notify the study team regarding capsule passage. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 57 ± 18 years; 61% female) were included. A total of 57 patients were included in the analysis (3 lost to follow-up; 28 in POE group; 29 in WB group). Capsule passage status was reported by 68% without significant difference between POE and WB groups (72% vs. 64%; p =.51). Capsule passage status was obtained from all 57 patients with the addition of a proactive follow-up. Only 56% (n = 32) reported visualizing capsule passage. Of the remaining patients who did not visualize capsule passage, 60% (n = 15) reported on this without significant difference between the POE and WB groups (p =.23). Conclusions: Lack of visualization of capsule passage is a poor indicator of retention. Self-reporting of VCE passage status is suboptimal and the addition of a visual aid did not improve this parameter.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Audiovisual Aids
Patient Education
Capsules
Prospective Studies
Wrist
Capsule Endoscopy
Pamphlets
Lost to Follow-Up

Keywords

  • Capsule endoscopy
  • capsule retention
  • patient education
  • visual aid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Patient-oriented education and visual-aid intervention are inadequate to identify patients with potential capsule retention : a prospective randomized study. / Al-Bawardy, Badr; Kamboj, Amrit K.; Desai, Shiv; Gorospe, Emmanuel; Bruining, David H; Gostout, Christopher J.; Hansel, Stephanie L.; Larson, Mark V.; Murray, Joseph A; Nehra, Vandana; Leggett, Cadman; Szarka, Lawrence; Watson, Robert E.; Rajan, Elizabeth.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Bawardy, Badr ; Kamboj, Amrit K. ; Desai, Shiv ; Gorospe, Emmanuel ; Bruining, David H ; Gostout, Christopher J. ; Hansel, Stephanie L. ; Larson, Mark V. ; Murray, Joseph A ; Nehra, Vandana ; Leggett, Cadman ; Szarka, Lawrence ; Watson, Robert E. ; Rajan, Elizabeth. / Patient-oriented education and visual-aid intervention are inadequate to identify patients with potential capsule retention : a prospective randomized study. In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. 2019.
@article{3e78f71d5d9046b89af9e326f07cf337,
title = "Patient-oriented education and visual-aid intervention are inadequate to identify patients with potential capsule retention: a prospective randomized study",
abstract = "Background/aims: The key procedure-related risk with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is capsule retention, which should be suspected in patients who have not reported capsule passage. The study aims were to determine the frequency of capsule passage visualization and the difference in self-reporting of capsule passage between patients who receive patient-oriented education (POE) and patients who receive POE and a visual aid intervention in the form of a wrist band (WB). Methods: This was a prospective randomized study that enrolled patients undergoing VCE. Patients were randomly assigned to a POE group versus a POE and WB group. POE consisted of verbal education and an information booklet. Both groups received instructions to notify the study team regarding capsule passage. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 57 ± 18 years; 61{\%} female) were included. A total of 57 patients were included in the analysis (3 lost to follow-up; 28 in POE group; 29 in WB group). Capsule passage status was reported by 68{\%} without significant difference between POE and WB groups (72{\%} vs. 64{\%}; p =.51). Capsule passage status was obtained from all 57 patients with the addition of a proactive follow-up. Only 56{\%} (n = 32) reported visualizing capsule passage. Of the remaining patients who did not visualize capsule passage, 60{\%} (n = 15) reported on this without significant difference between the POE and WB groups (p =.23). Conclusions: Lack of visualization of capsule passage is a poor indicator of retention. Self-reporting of VCE passage status is suboptimal and the addition of a visual aid did not improve this parameter.",
keywords = "Capsule endoscopy, capsule retention, patient education, visual aid",
author = "Badr Al-Bawardy and Kamboj, {Amrit K.} and Shiv Desai and Emmanuel Gorospe and Bruining, {David H} and Gostout, {Christopher J.} and Hansel, {Stephanie L.} and Larson, {Mark V.} and Murray, {Joseph A} and Vandana Nehra and Cadman Leggett and Lawrence Szarka and Watson, {Robert E.} and Elizabeth Rajan",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00365521.2019.1608465",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0036-5521",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient-oriented education and visual-aid intervention are inadequate to identify patients with potential capsule retention

T2 - a prospective randomized study

AU - Al-Bawardy, Badr

AU - Kamboj, Amrit K.

AU - Desai, Shiv

AU - Gorospe, Emmanuel

AU - Bruining, David H

AU - Gostout, Christopher J.

AU - Hansel, Stephanie L.

AU - Larson, Mark V.

AU - Murray, Joseph A

AU - Nehra, Vandana

AU - Leggett, Cadman

AU - Szarka, Lawrence

AU - Watson, Robert E.

AU - Rajan, Elizabeth

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background/aims: The key procedure-related risk with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is capsule retention, which should be suspected in patients who have not reported capsule passage. The study aims were to determine the frequency of capsule passage visualization and the difference in self-reporting of capsule passage between patients who receive patient-oriented education (POE) and patients who receive POE and a visual aid intervention in the form of a wrist band (WB). Methods: This was a prospective randomized study that enrolled patients undergoing VCE. Patients were randomly assigned to a POE group versus a POE and WB group. POE consisted of verbal education and an information booklet. Both groups received instructions to notify the study team regarding capsule passage. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 57 ± 18 years; 61% female) were included. A total of 57 patients were included in the analysis (3 lost to follow-up; 28 in POE group; 29 in WB group). Capsule passage status was reported by 68% without significant difference between POE and WB groups (72% vs. 64%; p =.51). Capsule passage status was obtained from all 57 patients with the addition of a proactive follow-up. Only 56% (n = 32) reported visualizing capsule passage. Of the remaining patients who did not visualize capsule passage, 60% (n = 15) reported on this without significant difference between the POE and WB groups (p =.23). Conclusions: Lack of visualization of capsule passage is a poor indicator of retention. Self-reporting of VCE passage status is suboptimal and the addition of a visual aid did not improve this parameter.

AB - Background/aims: The key procedure-related risk with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is capsule retention, which should be suspected in patients who have not reported capsule passage. The study aims were to determine the frequency of capsule passage visualization and the difference in self-reporting of capsule passage between patients who receive patient-oriented education (POE) and patients who receive POE and a visual aid intervention in the form of a wrist band (WB). Methods: This was a prospective randomized study that enrolled patients undergoing VCE. Patients were randomly assigned to a POE group versus a POE and WB group. POE consisted of verbal education and an information booklet. Both groups received instructions to notify the study team regarding capsule passage. Results: Sixty patients (mean age 57 ± 18 years; 61% female) were included. A total of 57 patients were included in the analysis (3 lost to follow-up; 28 in POE group; 29 in WB group). Capsule passage status was reported by 68% without significant difference between POE and WB groups (72% vs. 64%; p =.51). Capsule passage status was obtained from all 57 patients with the addition of a proactive follow-up. Only 56% (n = 32) reported visualizing capsule passage. Of the remaining patients who did not visualize capsule passage, 60% (n = 15) reported on this without significant difference between the POE and WB groups (p =.23). Conclusions: Lack of visualization of capsule passage is a poor indicator of retention. Self-reporting of VCE passage status is suboptimal and the addition of a visual aid did not improve this parameter.

KW - Capsule endoscopy

KW - capsule retention

KW - patient education

KW - visual aid

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065211010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065211010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00365521.2019.1608465

DO - 10.1080/00365521.2019.1608465

M3 - Article

C2 - 31034255

AN - SCOPUS:85065211010

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0036-5521

ER -