Paths of least flow-resistance: Characterization for the optimization of synthetic tissue scaffold design

Timothy Kline, Erik L. Ritman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A method for the analysis of preferred fluid movement into and out of porous specimen's pore networks has been developed that characterizes the flow pathways inside a pore network, an important property for the design of future synthetic tissue scaffolds. Current tissue scaffolds rely on diffusion as the solute transport mechanism for the sustenance and growth of cells into the scaffold's pore network. Utilizing convective transport induced by periodic scaffold deformation or subjecting the scaffold to a fluid pressure gradient are proposed methods for delivery/removal of nutrients/metabolic waste products. These future designs require an understanding of the flow properties of the designed scaffold. The developed method for characterizing the paths of least flowresistance is applied to a computer model porous scaffold, a synthetic porous tissue scaffold, and a sea sponge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009
Pages606-609
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Jun 28 2009Jul 1 2009

Other

Other2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period6/28/097/1/09

Fingerprint

Tissue Scaffolds
Scaffolds
Waste Products
Porifera
Oceans and Seas
Computer Simulation
Solute transport
Fluids
Pressure
Food
Pressure gradient
Nutrients
Growth
Cells

Keywords

  • Fast marching
  • Hagen-poiseuille
  • Porous materials
  • Sea sponge
  • Skeletonization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Kline, T., & Ritman, E. L. (2009). Paths of least flow-resistance: Characterization for the optimization of synthetic tissue scaffold design. In Proceedings - 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009 (pp. 606-609). [5193120] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2009.5193120

Paths of least flow-resistance : Characterization for the optimization of synthetic tissue scaffold design. / Kline, Timothy; Ritman, Erik L.

Proceedings - 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009. 2009. p. 606-609 5193120.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kline, T & Ritman, EL 2009, Paths of least flow-resistance: Characterization for the optimization of synthetic tissue scaffold design. in Proceedings - 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009., 5193120, pp. 606-609, 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009, Boston, MA, United States, 6/28/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2009.5193120
Kline T, Ritman EL. Paths of least flow-resistance: Characterization for the optimization of synthetic tissue scaffold design. In Proceedings - 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009. 2009. p. 606-609. 5193120 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2009.5193120
Kline, Timothy ; Ritman, Erik L. / Paths of least flow-resistance : Characterization for the optimization of synthetic tissue scaffold design. Proceedings - 2009 IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI 2009. 2009. pp. 606-609
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