Pathophysiology and Management of Intracranial Hypertension and Tissular Brain Hypoxia After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: An Integrative Approach

Daniel Agustín Godoy, Santiago Lubillo, Alejandro Rabinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring intracranial pressure in comatose patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is considered necessary by most experts. Acute intracranial hypertension (IHT), when severe and sustained, is a life-threatening complication that demands emergency treatment. Yet, secondary anoxic-ischemic injury after brain trauma can occur in the absence of IHT. In such cases, adding other monitoring modalities can alert clinicians when the patient is in a state of energy failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of IHT and brain hypoxia after TBI, emphasizing the need to develop a physiologically integrative approach to the management of these complex situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-212
Number of pages18
JournalNeurosurgery Clinics of North America
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Brain Hypoxia
Intracranial Hypertension
Emergency Treatment
Intracranial Pressure
Coma
Wounds and Injuries
Traumatic Brain Injury
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acute brain injury
  • Brain hypoxia
  • Cerebral oxygenation
  • Cerebral perfusion pressure
  • Intracranial hypertension
  • Intracranial pressure
  • Multimodal monitoring
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Pathophysiology and Management of Intracranial Hypertension and Tissular Brain Hypoxia After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury : An Integrative Approach. / Godoy, Daniel Agustín; Lubillo, Santiago; Rabinstein, Alejandro.

In: Neurosurgery Clinics of North America, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.04.2018, p. 195-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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