Pathophysiology and Management of Intracranial Hypertension and Tissular Brain Hypoxia After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: An Integrative Approach

Daniel Agustín Godoy, Santiago Lubillo, Alejandro Rabinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monitoring intracranial pressure in comatose patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is considered necessary by most experts. Acute intracranial hypertension (IHT), when severe and sustained, is a life-threatening complication that demands emergency treatment. Yet, secondary anoxic-ischemic injury after brain trauma can occur in the absence of IHT. In such cases, adding other monitoring modalities can alert clinicians when the patient is in a state of energy failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of IHT and brain hypoxia after TBI, emphasizing the need to develop a physiologically integrative approach to the management of these complex situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-212
Number of pages18
JournalNeurosurgery Clinics of North America
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Keywords

  • Acute brain injury
  • Brain hypoxia
  • Cerebral oxygenation
  • Cerebral perfusion pressure
  • Intracranial hypertension
  • Intracranial pressure
  • Multimodal monitoring
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Pathophysiology and Management of Intracranial Hypertension and Tissular Brain Hypoxia After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: An Integrative Approach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this