Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus

David Safronetz, Marko Zivcec, Rachel LaCasse, Friederike Feldmann, Rebecca Rosenke, Dan Long, Elaine Haddock, Douglas Brining, Donald Gardner, Heinz Feldmann, Hideki Ebihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), also referred to as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS), is a rare but frequently fatal disease caused by New World hantaviruses. In humans HPS is associated with severe pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock; however, the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclear largely due to a lack of suitable animal models for the study of disease progression. In this study we monitored clinical, virological, pathophysiological parameters and host immunological responses to decipher pathological factors and events in the lethal Syrian hamster model of HPS following intranasal inoculation of Andes virus. Transcriptional profiling of the host gene responses demonstrated a suppression of innate immune responses in most organs analyzed during the early stage of infection, except for in the lung which had low level activation of several pro-inflammatory genes. During this phase Andes virus established a systemic infection in hamsters, with viral antigen readily detectable in the endothelium of the majority of tissues analyzed by 7-8 days post-inoculation. Despite wide-spread infection, histological analysis confirmed pathological abnormalities were almost exclusively found in the lungs. Immediately preceding clinical signs of disease, intense activation of pro-inflammatory and Th1/Th2 responses were observed in the lungs as well as the heart, but not in peripheral organs, suggesting that localized immune-modulations by infection is paramount to pathogenesis. Throughout the course of infection a strong suppression of regulatory T-cell responses was noted and is hypothesized to be the basis of the aberrant immune activations. The unique and comprehensive monitoring of host immune responses to hantavirus infection increases our understanding of the immuno-pathogenesis of HPS and will facilitate the development of treatment strategies targeting deleterious host immunological responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1002426
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hantavirus
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Mesocricetus
Infection
Lung
Hantavirus Infections
Immunologic Monitoring
Cardiogenic Shock
Viral Antigens
Pulmonary Edema
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Innate Immunity
Cricetinae
Genes
Endothelium
Disease Progression
Animal Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Virology

Cite this

Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus. / Safronetz, David; Zivcec, Marko; LaCasse, Rachel; Feldmann, Friederike; Rosenke, Rebecca; Long, Dan; Haddock, Elaine; Brining, Douglas; Gardner, Donald; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki.

In: PLoS Pathogens, Vol. 7, No. 12, e1002426, 01.12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safronetz, D, Zivcec, M, LaCasse, R, Feldmann, F, Rosenke, R, Long, D, Haddock, E, Brining, D, Gardner, D, Feldmann, H & Ebihara, H 2011, 'Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus', PLoS Pathogens, vol. 7, no. 12, e1002426. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002426
Safronetz, David ; Zivcec, Marko ; LaCasse, Rachel ; Feldmann, Friederike ; Rosenke, Rebecca ; Long, Dan ; Haddock, Elaine ; Brining, Douglas ; Gardner, Donald ; Feldmann, Heinz ; Ebihara, Hideki. / Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus. In: PLoS Pathogens. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 12.
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