Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Imaging description In partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) there is an abnormal connection between the draining veins of one or more lobes to a systemic venous structure that drains into the right side of the heart, resulting in a left-to-right shunt. On CT the anomalous venous return is diagnosed based on recognizing the abnormal course of the intraparenchymal pulmonary vein. There are three common patterns of anomalous drainage: Anomalous right superior pulmonary venous drainage to the superior vena cava (SVC) – on CT the right upper lobe drains into the SVC, usually near the SVC/right atrial (RA) junction (Figure 53.1). Anomalous left superior pulmonary venous return to the left brachiocephalic (innominate) vein – on CT a vertical vein is seen coursing lateral to the aortic arch and aortopulmonary window. Blood flow is caudocranial (Figure 53.2). Anomalous right lower lobe drainage into the inferior vena cava (IVC), portal vein, or hepatic vein – on CT the right lower lobe vein courses inferomedially to connect with one of these structures (Figures 53.3 and 53.4).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages138-141
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9780511977701, 9780521119078
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Scimitar Syndrome
Superior Vena Cava
Brachiocephalic Veins
Drainage
Veins
Lung
Hepatic Veins
Pulmonary Veins
Inferior Vena Cava
Portal Vein
Thoracic Aorta

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sykes, A-M. G. (2011). Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR). In Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses (pp. 138-141). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.054

Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR). / Sykes, Anne-Marie Gisele.

Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 138-141.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sykes, A-MG 2011, Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR). in Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, pp. 138-141. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.054
Sykes A-MG. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR). In Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 138-141 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511977701.054
Sykes, Anne-Marie Gisele. / Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR). Pearls and Pitfalls in Thoracic Imaging: Variants and Other Difficult Diagnoses. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 138-141
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