PAPNET analysis of reportedly negative smears preceding the diagnosis of a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or carcinoma.

Mark E. Sherman, L. J. Mango, D. Kelly, G. Paull, V. Ludin, C. Copeland, D. Solomon, M. H. Schiffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One hundred fourteen cervical smears obtained from 18 women developing biopsy-proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and two with invasive squamous carcinomas were analyzed by two pathologists using the PAPNET neural network-based automated screening system (PAPNET Analyses A and B). The smears were originally reported as negative and had been previously rescreened and reclassified according to The Bethesda System. Using the PAPNET video displays of 128 potentially abnormal cellular images per smear, each reviewer (PAPNET A and B) determined whether a smear required conventional rescreening. Results of the PAPNET triage were compared with the reclassification diagnoses of the smears by conventional microscopy. PAPNET Analysis A selected eight (14%) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69%) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 15 (71%) as squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) for rescreening. In PAPNET Analysis A, two (10%) SILs were not selected for rescreening, and four (19%) were considered unsatisfactory for analysis. PAPNET Analysis B selected 21 (37%) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69%) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 18 (86%) as SIL for review. In PAPNET Analysis B, two (10%) SILs were missed, and one (5%) smear was unsatisfactory for analysis. Each PAPNET analysis selected smears for rescreening in 19 (95%) of 20 patients and detected SILs in 10 patients that were missed in the original screening. Using PAPNET, SILs would have been detected a median of 56 months (PAPNET A) and 62 months (PAPNET B) before their actual discovery. These preliminary data suggest that PAPNET may help detect SILs missed in routine cytologic screening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-581
Number of pages4
JournalModern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
Volume7
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jun 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carcinoma
Vaginal Smears
Triage
Microscopy
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Biopsy
Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Cervix
Atypical Squamous Cells of the Cervix
Pathologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

PAPNET analysis of reportedly negative smears preceding the diagnosis of a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or carcinoma. / Sherman, Mark E.; Mango, L. J.; Kelly, D.; Paull, G.; Ludin, V.; Copeland, C.; Solomon, D.; Schiffman, M. H.

In: Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc, Vol. 7, No. 5, 06.1994, p. 578-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b33f8e4ce33d40d1a40ff29ada2831db,
title = "PAPNET analysis of reportedly negative smears preceding the diagnosis of a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or carcinoma.",
abstract = "One hundred fourteen cervical smears obtained from 18 women developing biopsy-proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and two with invasive squamous carcinomas were analyzed by two pathologists using the PAPNET neural network-based automated screening system (PAPNET Analyses A and B). The smears were originally reported as negative and had been previously rescreened and reclassified according to The Bethesda System. Using the PAPNET video displays of 128 potentially abnormal cellular images per smear, each reviewer (PAPNET A and B) determined whether a smear required conventional rescreening. Results of the PAPNET triage were compared with the reclassification diagnoses of the smears by conventional microscopy. PAPNET Analysis A selected eight (14{\%}) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69{\%}) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 15 (71{\%}) as squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) for rescreening. In PAPNET Analysis A, two (10{\%}) SILs were not selected for rescreening, and four (19{\%}) were considered unsatisfactory for analysis. PAPNET Analysis B selected 21 (37{\%}) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69{\%}) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 18 (86{\%}) as SIL for review. In PAPNET Analysis B, two (10{\%}) SILs were missed, and one (5{\%}) smear was unsatisfactory for analysis. Each PAPNET analysis selected smears for rescreening in 19 (95{\%}) of 20 patients and detected SILs in 10 patients that were missed in the original screening. Using PAPNET, SILs would have been detected a median of 56 months (PAPNET A) and 62 months (PAPNET B) before their actual discovery. These preliminary data suggest that PAPNET may help detect SILs missed in routine cytologic screening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
author = "Sherman, {Mark E.} and Mango, {L. J.} and D. Kelly and G. Paull and V. Ludin and C. Copeland and D. Solomon and Schiffman, {M. H.}",
year = "1994",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "578--581",
journal = "Modern Pathology",
issn = "0893-3952",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - PAPNET analysis of reportedly negative smears preceding the diagnosis of a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or carcinoma.

AU - Sherman, Mark E.

AU - Mango, L. J.

AU - Kelly, D.

AU - Paull, G.

AU - Ludin, V.

AU - Copeland, C.

AU - Solomon, D.

AU - Schiffman, M. H.

PY - 1994/6

Y1 - 1994/6

N2 - One hundred fourteen cervical smears obtained from 18 women developing biopsy-proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and two with invasive squamous carcinomas were analyzed by two pathologists using the PAPNET neural network-based automated screening system (PAPNET Analyses A and B). The smears were originally reported as negative and had been previously rescreened and reclassified according to The Bethesda System. Using the PAPNET video displays of 128 potentially abnormal cellular images per smear, each reviewer (PAPNET A and B) determined whether a smear required conventional rescreening. Results of the PAPNET triage were compared with the reclassification diagnoses of the smears by conventional microscopy. PAPNET Analysis A selected eight (14%) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69%) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 15 (71%) as squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) for rescreening. In PAPNET Analysis A, two (10%) SILs were not selected for rescreening, and four (19%) were considered unsatisfactory for analysis. PAPNET Analysis B selected 21 (37%) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69%) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 18 (86%) as SIL for review. In PAPNET Analysis B, two (10%) SILs were missed, and one (5%) smear was unsatisfactory for analysis. Each PAPNET analysis selected smears for rescreening in 19 (95%) of 20 patients and detected SILs in 10 patients that were missed in the original screening. Using PAPNET, SILs would have been detected a median of 56 months (PAPNET A) and 62 months (PAPNET B) before their actual discovery. These preliminary data suggest that PAPNET may help detect SILs missed in routine cytologic screening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

AB - One hundred fourteen cervical smears obtained from 18 women developing biopsy-proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and two with invasive squamous carcinomas were analyzed by two pathologists using the PAPNET neural network-based automated screening system (PAPNET Analyses A and B). The smears were originally reported as negative and had been previously rescreened and reclassified according to The Bethesda System. Using the PAPNET video displays of 128 potentially abnormal cellular images per smear, each reviewer (PAPNET A and B) determined whether a smear required conventional rescreening. Results of the PAPNET triage were compared with the reclassification diagnoses of the smears by conventional microscopy. PAPNET Analysis A selected eight (14%) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69%) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 15 (71%) as squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) for rescreening. In PAPNET Analysis A, two (10%) SILs were not selected for rescreening, and four (19%) were considered unsatisfactory for analysis. PAPNET Analysis B selected 21 (37%) smears reclassified as negative, 25 (69%) as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 18 (86%) as SIL for review. In PAPNET Analysis B, two (10%) SILs were missed, and one (5%) smear was unsatisfactory for analysis. Each PAPNET analysis selected smears for rescreening in 19 (95%) of 20 patients and detected SILs in 10 patients that were missed in the original screening. Using PAPNET, SILs would have been detected a median of 56 months (PAPNET A) and 62 months (PAPNET B) before their actual discovery. These preliminary data suggest that PAPNET may help detect SILs missed in routine cytologic screening.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028454508&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028454508&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7937724

AN - SCOPUS:0028454508

VL - 7

SP - 578

EP - 581

JO - Modern Pathology

JF - Modern Pathology

SN - 0893-3952

IS - 5

ER -