Paliperidone as a mood stabilizer: A pre-frontal cortex synaptoneurosomal proteomics comparison with lithium and valproic acid after chronic treatment reveals similarities in protein expression

Maria del Pilar Corena-McLeod, Alfredo Oliveros, Cristine Charlesworth, Benjamin Madden, Yian Qi Liang, Mona Boules, Amanda Shaw, Katrina Williams, Elliott Richelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A series of recent studies has demonstrated that the molecules involved in regulation of neuronal plasticity are also involved in the mode of action of antidepressants and mood stabilizer drugs. Intracellular calcium signaling, energy metabolism, and neuronal plasticity can be influenced by inducing axonal remodeling and increasing levels of certain synaptic proteins. Because antipsychotic drugs are used as mood stabilizers our studies focused on a newly-marketed antipsychotic drug, paliperidone. We determined changes in rat synaptoneurosomal proteins after chronic treatment with paliperidone, lithium salt, or valproic acid in order to find similarities or differences between the mode of action of paliperidone and these two classical mood stabilizers. We determined differential protein expression profiles in prefrontal cortex (PFC) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 4/group). Synaptoneurosomal-enriched preparations were obtained from PFC after chronic treatment with these three drugs. Proteins were separated by 2D-DIGE and identified by nano-LC-MS/MS. We observed similar protein expression profiles at the synaptoneurosomal level, suggesting that the mode of action for paliperidone is similar to that of lithium and valproic acid. However, the expression profile for paliperidone was more similar to that of lithium. Pathways affected in common by these two drugs included oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport, carbohydrate metabolism, and post-synaptic cytokinesis implicating the effects of these drugs in signaling pathways, energy metabolism, and synaptic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-19
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Research
Volume1233
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2008

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Valproic Acid
Frontal Lobe
Lithium
Proteomics
Neuronal Plasticity
Proteins
Prefrontal Cortex
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Energy Metabolism
Antipsychotic Agents
Two-Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis
Calcium Signaling
Cytokinesis
Oxidative Phosphorylation
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Electron Transport
Antidepressive Agents
Sprague Dawley Rats
Salts
Paliperidone Palmitate

Keywords

  • Lithium
  • Mood stabilizers
  • Paliperidone
  • Proteomics
  • Synaptoneurosome
  • Valproate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Paliperidone as a mood stabilizer : A pre-frontal cortex synaptoneurosomal proteomics comparison with lithium and valproic acid after chronic treatment reveals similarities in protein expression. / Corena-McLeod, Maria del Pilar; Oliveros, Alfredo; Charlesworth, Cristine; Madden, Benjamin; Liang, Yian Qi; Boules, Mona; Shaw, Amanda; Williams, Katrina; Richelson, Elliott.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1233, 03.10.2008, p. 8-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corena-McLeod, Maria del Pilar ; Oliveros, Alfredo ; Charlesworth, Cristine ; Madden, Benjamin ; Liang, Yian Qi ; Boules, Mona ; Shaw, Amanda ; Williams, Katrina ; Richelson, Elliott. / Paliperidone as a mood stabilizer : A pre-frontal cortex synaptoneurosomal proteomics comparison with lithium and valproic acid after chronic treatment reveals similarities in protein expression. In: Brain Research. 2008 ; Vol. 1233. pp. 8-19.
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