p53 gene deletion detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization is an adverse prognostic factor for patients with multiple myeloma following autologous stem cell transplantation

Hong Chang, Connie Qi, Qi Long Yi, Donna Reece, A. Keith Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the relevance of p53 deletions to the clinical outcome of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. Hemizygous p53 gene deletions were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 10 of 105 (9.5%) patients studied. p53 deletions were associated with higher serum calcium (P = .0062) and creatinine (P = .013) levels, but there were no association with patient age, gender, β2-microglobulin, C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, albumin or bone lytic lesions, or immunoglobulin isotype. There were no associations of p53 deletions with 13q deletions or translocations t(11;14) or t(4;14). Patients with p53 deletions had significantly shorter progression-free (median, 7.9 versus 25.7 months, P = .0324) and overall survival (median, 14.7 versus 48.1 months, P = .0008) than patients without a p53 deletion. A multivariate analysis confirmed p53 deletion was an independent prognostic factor predicting shortened progression-free (P = .0009) or overall survival (P = .0002) in patients with MM after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-360
Number of pages3
JournalBlood
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

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