Oxygen cost of exercise hyperpnea: Implications for performance

E. A. Aaron, K. C. Seow, Bruce David Johnson, J. A. Dempsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

228 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We addressed two questions concerned with the metabolic cost and performance of respiratory muscles in healthy young subjects during exercise: 1) does exercise hyperpnea ever attain a 'critical useful level'? and 2) is the work of breathing (Ẇ(v)) at maximum O 2 uptake (V̇O(2 max)) fatiguing to the respiratory muscles? During progressive exercise to maximum, we measured tidal expiratory flow-volume and transpulmonary pressure- (Ptp) volume loops. At rest, subjects mimicked their maximum and moderate exercise Ptp-volume loops, and we measured the O 2 cost of the hyperpnea (V̇O(2 RM)) and the length of time subjects could maintain reproduction of their maximum exercise loop. At maximum exercise, the O 2 cost of ventilation (V̇E) averaged 10 ± 0.7% of the V̇O(2 max). In subjects who used most of their maximum reserve for expiratory flow and for inspiratory muscle pressure development during maximum exercise, the V̇O(2 RM) required 13-15% of V̇O(2 max). The O 2 cost of increasing V̇E from one work rate to the next rose from 8% of the increase in total body V̇O 2 (V̇O(2 T)) during moderate exercise to 39 ± 10% in the transition from heavy to maximum exercise; but in only one case of extreme hyperventilation, combined with a plateauing of the V̇O(2 T), did the increase in V̇O(2 RM) equal the increase in V̇O(2 T). All subjects were able to voluntarily mimic maximum exercise Ẇ(v) for 3-10 times longer than the duration of the maximum exercise. We conclude that the O 2 cost of exercise hyperpnea is a significant fraction of the total V̇O(2 max) but is not sufficient to cause a critical level of 'useful' hyperpnea to be achieved in healthy subjects. The V̇E and Ẇ(v) during maximum exercise are nonfatiguing and sustainable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1818-1825
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume72
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exercise
Oxygen
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ventilation
Respiratory Muscles
Healthy Volunteers
Work of Breathing
Pressure
Hyperventilation
Muscle Development
Reproduction

Keywords

  • 'useful' hyperpnea
  • exercise limitation
  • hyperventilation
  • respiratory muscle fatigue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Aaron, E. A., Seow, K. C., Johnson, B. D., & Dempsey, J. A. (1992). Oxygen cost of exercise hyperpnea: Implications for performance. Journal of Applied Physiology, 72(5), 1818-1825.

Oxygen cost of exercise hyperpnea : Implications for performance. / Aaron, E. A.; Seow, K. C.; Johnson, Bruce David; Dempsey, J. A.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 72, No. 5, 1992, p. 1818-1825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aaron, EA, Seow, KC, Johnson, BD & Dempsey, JA 1992, 'Oxygen cost of exercise hyperpnea: Implications for performance', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 72, no. 5, pp. 1818-1825.
Aaron, E. A. ; Seow, K. C. ; Johnson, Bruce David ; Dempsey, J. A. / Oxygen cost of exercise hyperpnea : Implications for performance. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1992 ; Vol. 72, No. 5. pp. 1818-1825.
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