Overnight hypoxic exposure and glucagon-like peptide-1 and leptin levels in humans

Eric M. Snyder, Richard D. Carr, Carolyn F. Deacon, Bruce David Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Altitude exposure has been associated with loss of appetite and weight loss in healthy humans; however, the endocrine factors that contribute to these changes remain unclear. Leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are peptide hormones that contribute to the regulation of appetite. Leptin increases with hypoxia; however, the influence of hypoxia on GLP-1 has not been studied in animals or humans to date. We sought to determine the influence of normobaric hypoxia on plasma leptin and GLP-1 levels in 25 healthy humans. Subjects ingested a control meal during normoxia and after 17 h of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen of 12.5%, simulating approximately 4100 m). Plasma leptin was assessed before the meal, and GLP-1 was assessed premeal, at 20 min postmeal, and at 40 min postmeal. We found that hypoxia caused a significant elevation in plasma leptin levels (normoxia, 4.9 ± 0.8 pg·mL-1; hypoxia, 7.7 ± 1.5 pg·mL-1; p < 0.05; range, -16% to 190%), no change in the average GLP-1 response to hypoxia, and only a small trend toward an increase in GLP-1 levels 40 min postmeal (fasting, 15.7 ± 0.9 vs 15.9 ± 0.7 pmol·L -1; 20 min postmeal, 21.7 ± 0.9 vs 21.8 ± 1.2 pmol·L-1; 40 min postmeal, 19.5 ± 1.2 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2 pmol·L-1 for normoxia and hypoxia, respectively; p > 0.05 normoxia vs hypoxia). There was a correlation between SaO2 and leptin after the 17 h exposure (r = 0.45; p < 0.05), but no relation between SaO2 and GLP-1. These data confirm that leptin increases with hypoxic exposure in humans. Further study is needed to determine the influence of hypoxia and altitude on GLP-1 levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)929-935
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Fingerprint

Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Leptin
Meals
Altitude Sickness
Appetite Regulation
Peptide Hormones
Appetite
Hypoxia
Weight Loss
Oxygen

Keywords

  • Anorexia
  • Appetite
  • High-altitude
  • Low-oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Overnight hypoxic exposure and glucagon-like peptide-1 and leptin levels in humans. / Snyder, Eric M.; Carr, Richard D.; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Johnson, Bruce David.

In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 33, No. 5, 10.2008, p. 929-935.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snyder, Eric M. ; Carr, Richard D. ; Deacon, Carolyn F. ; Johnson, Bruce David. / Overnight hypoxic exposure and glucagon-like peptide-1 and leptin levels in humans. In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. 2008 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 929-935.
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